Aboriginal Perspectives

The University of Regina has used video material featuring aboriginal people as a base for constructing teaching resources and we invite teachers to use these resources. We also encourage teachers to use this video material to construct their own lessons.

Lesson Plans by Video

Download these lesson plans in PDF format. The accompanying educational documentaries can be watched in Full Screen on your computer or projected in the classroom.

Link to: Tipi Raising with Elder Glen Anaquod

Saulteaux, Muscowpetung First Nation

Glen Anaquod is an Aboriginal elder from the Muscowpetung First Nation. He is involved with the University of Regina Aboriginal Student Center as an active elder. The grandmothers in his community taught him how to set up a tipi as a young boy and now has taken his part to pass the methods he has been taught to students. As an elder, Glen enjoys being able to share the traditions of the tipi with the younger generations.

Link to: Cassandra Opikokew, Journalist

Cree, Canoe Lake Cree First Nation

As an Aboriginal student who attended both the First Nations University of Canada and the University of Regina School of Journalism, Cassandra Opikokew understands what is involved in becoming a Journalist. She graduated from the School of Journalism in the Spring of 2009, and is ready to use her skills to possibly pursue another degree. She understands the dynamics of both the Indian Communication Arts Program at FNUC and the School...

Link to: Birch Bark Biting with Rosella Carney

Cree, Molanosa, Saskatchewan

The videos below are part of an interview conducted with an Aboriginal woman named Rosella Carney talking about the art of birch bark biting. Rosella Carney is from Molanosa, Saskatchewan, just North of Montreal Lake. She is one of a handful of people that still do birch-bark biting. She was taught by a cultural resource teacher and now shares the art with others. She also does moose-hair tufting and teaches the Cree language. Rosella...

Link to: Tara Littlechief, Nurse

White Bear First Nations

Tara Littlechief has wanted to be a nurse since she was eight years old. She is just completing her final year in a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree in a collaborative program offered by the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) and the University of Saskatchewan. During her studies she was part of the Native Access Program to Nursing (NAPN).

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Link to: Dr. Alika Lafontaine, Physician

Métis

In his interview Dr. Alika Lafontaine makes wide ranging comments on his educational experiences and practice as a physician. He talks about being labeled with a learning disability, his subsequent home schooling, his undergraduate days in the Faculty of Science at the University of Regina and his medical training at the University of Saskatchewan. He discusses his role models, how his Métis heritage influences his practice as a physician and comments on winning...

Link to: Kelly Quewezance, Social Worker

Salteaux, Keeseekoose First Nation

Kelly Quewezance is a member of the Keeseekoose First Nation in Saskatchewan. He has a degree in Social Work from the University of Regina. In the video clips he describes his role in distributing Treaty Annuity Payments as the North Band Governance officer of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC).

 

Links:

University of Regina Faculty of Social...

Link to: Tipi Raising with Tim Haywahe

Nakota, Carry the Kettle First Nation

On a rainy evening in August 2009 Tim Haywahe from Carry the Kettle First Nation in southern Saskatchewan led a group of Little Sisters through a tipi raising on the grounds of the First Nations University of Canada. During this process he talked to the girls about his traditional Nakota way of raising the tipi.

Lesson Plans uploaded by the community

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