Cara Di Staulo


Cara Di Staulo's picture
I am the Webmaster for IsumaTV! For the last four years, I have helped finance, coordinate and distribute several projects for the Artcirq Inuit Performance Collective, Arnait Video Productions, Kingulliit Productions and Igloolik Isuma Productions. Through these projects, I have had the privilege of traveling to Igloolik on three occasions, and discovering Inuit culture and way of life first hand. Since graduating from the University of Québec in Montréal (UQÀM) with a B.A. in Communications, I have also worked as Assistant Coordinator for the Montreal International Documentary Festival and the Producer's Network at the Cannes Film Festival. Since I was a child, I have been a huge movie buff. I also envoy cooking, discovering new flavors and cuisines, reading, biking, hiking and rock climbing.See more



Recent Uploads

  • First Peoples Festival in Peril

    First Peoples Festival in Peril

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    channel: Isuma News

    Is it possible for First Nations to hold a festival worthy of the name in Québec’s metropolis?

    The Montreal Frist Peoples Festival asks the question a press release distriburted this morning as the Partenariat du Quartier des spectacles (the PQDS), a paramunicipal body that administers a major program in support of events in Montreal’s downtown core cultural district, decided to cut off all grants to the Festival for the year 2014.

    The PQDS claims that the First Peoples Festival lacks sufficiently innovative programming. This is a surprising attack on the Montreal event that has very successfully and continually transformed itself over the years. Since it moved its activities to the Quartier des spectacles, it has offered a brand-new formula that richly highlights First Peoples culture, art and diversity.

    First Peoples Festival is a First Nations’ multi-disciplinary festival, an event unique in its genre and presented yearly by the Terres en vues/Land Insights society for the last 24 years.

    Last year, the festival succeeded in balancing its budget without a deficit although the very day its program was launched, June 18 2013, the PQDS announced a drastic $50 000 cut to the Festival’s budget. This year the festival was been hit with a great blow that could prove to be fatal.

    The festival states that this new obstacle is a test of the commitment of city of Montreal and government stakeholders to make a place for First Nations culture in Quebec’s metropolis and to associate these with the many commemorations set for city’s 375th anniversary in 2017.

    Festival organizers are demanding that those granting funds to the PQDS, the City of Montreal first and then the government of Québec, must take action without delay to reinstate a funding for First Peoples Festival within a structure that can allow it to develop and thrive.

    Moreover, the festival is questioning the very way funding is delivered by the PQSD. Organizers believe that it is high time, as ethical choices, corruption and fair practices are in the spotlight in Montréal during the ongoing Charbonneau Commission, to review the governance of this paramunicipal body that oversees such important budgets.


    Source: Land Insights






  • DID in the News!

    DID in the News!

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    channel: Isuma News

    On Their Terms: A Digital Project to Give Inuit Say in Developers' Arctic Ambitions

    BY Elisabeth Fraser

    A new project in Canada’s north is attempting to bridge the digital divide facing Inuit communities. In doing so, it hopes to give them a say as developers move to take advantage of their resource-rich land.

    Digital Indigenous Democracy (DID) is an effort to bring the community empowerment of new media technology into remote low-bandwidth indigenous communities in Nunavut, across Canada, and around the world,” says Norman Cohn, an award-winning Canadian filmmaker who is also the project co-director, with partner Zacharias Kunuk, an Inuk filmmaker.

    The idea is to provide high-speed Internet access to Inuit living in northern communities, where extremely low bandwidth access makes surfing the net a slow and cumbersome task. “These people, who most need access to these networks, have the worst cost-per-bandwidth in the civilized world,” says Cohn.

    Life in the Northern communities where Canada’s Inuit live can be challenging. Traditionally, the Inuit are a hunting society. However, nowadays both global warming and opposition from animal-rights groups are negatively affecting the hunt. There are high levels of poverty, substance abuse, and suicide. There is a housing shortage, and high levels of family violence, as well as chronic health problems like diabetes. The remote and vastly scattered locations of these villages carry distinct challenges as well, including sky-high prices on basic goods. Most places are hard to access from the south, accessible via boat during the summer, or by expensive flights year-round. And, despite federal investment to improve bandwidth access in these communities, the Internet remains very slow.

    Just how slow is it? “Most people can remember how the Internet was when they first tried it out five or ten years ago, and how much faster it is now,” explains Cohn. “Use of the Internet we take for granted right now is only possible because our bandwidth has increased by hundreds of thousands of times, and at a low cost. Those speed increases have not impacted northern Inuit communities. Their Internet is among the slowest and most expensive … There is a digital divide, certainly in the Canadian North, as much as in Bangladesh.”

    Canada’s Inuit are one of three Canadian Aboriginal groups (the others are the Métis and First Nations). They are somewhat unique amongst Indigenous peoples in North America, because they have negotiated a self-governing agreement with the federal government of Canada. Whereas Canadian and U.S. First-Nations people often live on government reserves and receive government assistance or a special tax status, Inuit are by and large self-sufficient.

    Cohn says the project is essential to help Inuit protect their rights in a new age of resource extraction. “The origins of this project are in the evolution of two enormous world developments. The one is the evolution of new media technology and its potential for social networking and political change, which we’ve seen in the Middle East,” Cohn says, referencing the Arab Spring. “And this intersects with the evolution of global warming, which has created an increase in natural resource development in the Canadian Arctic.”

    Digital Indigenous Democracy has been financed and tested around a specific giant mining development (the “Mary River Project”) by the Baffinland company.

    “If (the development) goes forward in its full capacity, it would be the largest mine ever in Canada,” says Cohn. DID was created in the context of Baffinland’s ongoing environmental review process, which involves consultation with local stakeholders. These talks have produced an Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement, as required by law under the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement.

    “Our project was proposed and financed to test out this technology as a way of improving Inuit communities’ ability to participate in the decision-making process of such an enormous development that will impact these communities forever,” Cohn says. “So, we had a compelling technological concept for equal justice, but we also had a compelling urgent need for that project to take place as soon as possible.”

    Started in April 2011 via Canada Media Fund financing, Digital Indigenous Democracy went live one year later, in April 2012. It runs on the ISUMA TV platform, created by Cohn and co. in 2008. The multimedia website features photographs and government information documents, as well as audio and video recordings, in English and in Indigenous languages like Inuktitut.

    In addition to putting forward local content, in the form of radio programming, films and documentaries, and community news,DID has played an active part in the local consultations involving the Baffinland project. A series of radio call-in shows allowed locals to ask experts questions about the development, and Baffinland feedback collected via DID has been complied into a report, which will be presented in the next round of public hearings, tentatively scheduled to take place in mid-October.

    Lloyd Lipsett is a human rights lawyer who has been participating in the public consultation process surrounding the Baffinland project. He took part in radio call-in shows the DID group organized in Igloolik, Nunavut, to answer questions and inform locals about the Baffinland project, in English and Inuktitut.

    “If you want the people to be confident that the mine is benefitting them, they need to have the information to make that judgment. It’s important to recognize that the movement towards transparency in the (extractive industry) is really picking up steam,” says Lipsett, who notes the Canadian government has announced it will pass binding regulations ensuring mining companies have greater disclosure towards various levels of government, something the United States and European Union have already done.

    Canadian constitutional law and international law now explicitly confirms Indigenous people have the right to be informed and consulted about any resource development that impacts their lands and their communities. According to Lispett, the new approach towards consultation offered by DID is a benefit to locals and developers alike.

    Most human-rights interventions involving extraction projects happen after development has started, when things are perceived to be going badly. “Getting involved in public hearings before the project has taken place; you are taking a proactive approach,” says Lispett. “You’re dealing with all the different stakeholders, including the company itself. To talk to them in a proactive, forward-looking manner, is much more constructive then pointing your finger after, and saying, “You’re doing this wrong, you’re violating this right, or that right…We’re offering you suggestions as to how you can develop this mine in a way that is respectful to people.”

    The economic stakes are significant, too."The wealth in the arctic is enormous,” says Cohn. “It’s sort of like the new Congo, but suddenly much more accessible than it ever was before. “The world has changed since King Leopold went into the Congo, but only if technology helps people take advantage of those changes. (DID) is the only way Indigenous people will get a real fair seat at the negotiating table, dividing up what everyone agrees are trillions of dollars.”

    Frances Abele is a Professor of Public Policy and Public Administration at Carleton University. She is familiar with the project. She touts the community-building aspect of DID. “If you haven’t been to the North, it’s very hard to picture just how far apart everything is,” she says. “To allow people to speak to each other in real time is a really powerful change in order to have people talk about their common interests, and politics.”

    “The local radio has been very, very, important for a long time, it’s the main way that people find out what’s going on, and they listen to that every day,” says Abele. “The genius of what Norman and Zacharias are doing is that they’ve been able to build on that network to create these communities.”

    Mark Airut is the manager of the Igloolik radio station, now run by ISUMA since last May. He is Inuk, and echoes Abele’s praise for DID. “I think it’s really great, lots and lots of people are now following us, and now they listen to our radio all over the world,” he says. He says since ISUMA took over, the station’s workers have gone from being voluntary to paid staff, and many locals say ISUMA radio is now all they listen to. “We’re doing our best work on educational stuff,” says Airut. “It’s really successful.”

    Currently, Cohn estimates the project is two-thirds completed. “Our website will play at high speed in what will eventually be ten indigenous communities,” he says. ISUMA has been hooking people up since the spring, and will continue to do so during the fall.

    Underlying the entire project is the principal of open data and transparency as a tool to combat inequality. “Indigenous people see these developments as the only chance they have to get out of poverty and into the 21st century,” says Cohn. “If all the people involved are sharing in the exploitation of the resources, then it’s not pejorative. If the people involved are being exploited, then its pejorative … Today, you cannot get away with that level of inequality unless it’s hidden from public view.”

    Cohn believes DID can be a powerful tool to give Indigenous people their fair share of the pie. “If people have those tools, you cannot deny them those rights,” he says. “These communities are sitting on mountains of minerals, of gold, of uranium.” He sees a future for this project in Indigenous communities throughout the world, and notes it is in developer’s interest to properly inform and consult, or risk huge lawsuits down the road.

    How much the Inuit will eventually profit from the Baffinland development remains to be seen, but Cohn is hopeful. “Indigenous people are not genetically impoverished,” he says. “If everyone owned the land they were living on, Inuit people could quite very well be rich,” he argues. “Why are Inuit peoples more like Palestinians than Saudi Arabians? In 2013, you can’t do that to people, unless you’re doing it in the dark.”

    Elisabeth Fraser is a freelance Canadian journalist. She lives in Montreal.

    Personal Democracy Media is grateful to the Omidyar Network and the UN Foundation for their generous support of techPresident's WeGov section.




  • Press Release

    Press Release

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    channel: Igloolik Radio Online

    Qikiqtaniq Voices: Live Broadcast of QIA Community Engagement Hearings

    Igloolik, November 9th, 2015 – IsumaTV and NITV are pleased to announce the live broadcast of the QIA Community Engagement Tour for Phase II of the Mary River Project.



  • June 2nd 2015 Community Information Session

    June 2nd 2015 Community Information Session

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    channel: Pond Inlet Radio Online

    The Nunavut Impact Review Board is holding a community information session about the Mary River Iron Mine Project.

    Learn more about the monitoring of the project, and share your comments.


    When: Tuesday June 2, 2015

    Where: Atakaalik Hall (Pond Inlet)

    Time: Starting at 8 pm


    Not in Pond Inlet? Can't make it to the Hall?

    Listen to the live audio feed from the meetings on IsumaTV at:



  • Stills


    by: Cara Di Staulo

    channel: My Father's Land

    Key film stills from the documentary film My Father's Land (Attatama Nunanga) by Zacharias Kunuk and Norman Cohn.




  • Inuit Views Presented at the Economist's Canada Summit

    Inuit Views Presented at the Economist's Canada Summit

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    channel: News

    Duane Smith of the Inuit Circumpolar Council (ICC) was invited by The Economist to present the views of Inuit at its premier Canadian event held here today, called The Canada Summit: Confronting the Big Questions.

    The event’s main panellists and speakers included Alberta’s Premier Jim Prentice and Bank of Canada Governor Stephen F. Poloz, as well as many bankers, economists, and chief executives who addressed issues such as global banking, energy, and investing in ideas.

    Mr. Smith was joined on a panel called “Canada and the Arctic Council” by former Toronto mayor and current CEO of WWF Canada, David Miller, and Tony Guthrie, Chief executive of De Beers Canada.

    Speaking as both ICC Canada President, and Vice Chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, Mr. Smith shared Inuit insights based on questions posed by moderator and Canada correspondent for The Economist, Madelaine Drohan. In contrast to Mr. Guthrie’s position that the Arctic was the “last global frontier”, Mr. Smith suggested that the Arctic was better described as a vibrant place full of life and, most notably, “a place where Inuit live in an area covering 40% of Canada’s land mass”.

    Both Mr. Smith and David Miller said that De Beers now exemplified many characteristics of a good corporate citizen in the Arctic but “they had to learn the hard way”, added the ICC Canada president.

    In response to a call for tougher rules for Arctic development by the WWF Canada head, and a call for fewer rules by the De Beers CEO, Duane Smith emphasized the importance of strictly following existing rules and constitutional arrangements that already exist. “We need to make sure the rules are not watered down, as some resource companies are asking for, but more importantly we need to make sure the existing arrangements, such as co-management are maintained and strengthened”, he added.

    David Miller praised Canada for having the foresight in 1996, when the Arctic Council was founded, to agree to having international indigenous peoples organizations play a direct and meaningful role alongside states in the Arctic Council, of which ICC is one of six.

    In response to a question on Arctic sovereignty, the ICC Canada President reminded the audience that sovereignty for Inuit included dimensions well beyond the buying of icebreakers, such as food security and social well-being.

    Mr. Smith said he saw the need back in 2011 for Inuit leaders from Greenland, Alaska, Russia, and Canada to forge a collective path on these matters and organized an Inuit Leaders’ Summit on resource development. He concluded by inviting those who want to understand “our own Inuit rules regarding development” to consult the ensuing 2011 A Circumpolar Declaration on Resource Development Principles in Inuit Nunaat, where “it is clear we want development partnerships, but on our terms and at the right pace”.

    Source: Inuit Circumpolar Council





  • Before Tomorrow

    Before Tomorrow

    by: IsumaTV

    Theatrical trailer

    Film premiers in Igloolik

    After the screening, audience members had a chance to examine props and costumes used in the film.

    Shooting wrapped

    more photos from the set

    Watch teaser

    Before Tomorrow in the press

    Women's collective screens film for home town crowd by Sonia Gunderson, Nunatsiaq News February 29, 2008 (read article)

    Creating together: Igloolik and Puvirnituq co-operate on Isumas third feature film by Jim Bell, Nunatsiaq News January 19, 2007 (read article)

    On the set of Before Tomorrow by Isabelle Dubois, Inuktitut Magazine Fall 2006 (pdf)

    Marie-Hélène Cousineau: Filmer l'intimité et l'imensité by Denis Lord, Elle Québec January 2007 (pdf)

    Before Tomorrow

    New in March 2010! Nine Canadian Genie Award nominations including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Actor, Adapted Screenplay, Art Direction, Costumes, Sound, Original Song. Four Quebec Jutra Award nominations, Best Picture, Director, Costumes, Music.

    More About Film   /   View Film or Download

    A co-production of Igloolik Isuma Productions and Kunuk Cohn Productions, Before Tomorrow is the first feature film written and directed by Igloolik's Arnait Video Productions women's collective, which has been filming Inuit women's stories since 1991 based on cultural authenticity and community involvement.

    Before Tomorrow is directed by Marie-Hélène Cousineau and Madeline Ivalu from a script by Susan Avingaq, Marie-Hélène Cousineau and Madeline Ivalu, adapted from the novel For morgendagen by the acclaimed Danish writer Jørn Riel. It is produced by Stéphane Rituit, with executive producers Norman Cohn and Zacharias Kunuk. Leading the cast are Madeline Ivalu and her grandson Paul-Dylan Ivalu, joined by Mary Qulitalik, Peter-Henry Arnatsiaq and Tumasie Sivuarapik.

    Before Tomorrow is the story of a woman who demonstrates that human dignity is at the core of life from beginning to end, as she faces with her grandson the ultimate challenge of survival. The film was shot in remote locations near the community of Puvirnituq, Nunavik (norhtern Quebec) over four separate periods between July 2006 and January 2007 to capture the arctic seasons from June though December.

    Before Tomorrow premiered in Igloolik on the weekend of February 23-24, 2008. Members of the Arnait Video collective (Susan Avingaq, Madeline Ivalu, Carol Kunnuk and Marie-Hélène Cousineau) presented the film in front of attentive audiences in the school gym. Actors, props and select costumes from the film were also on display. As with previous films produced by Igloolik Isuma Productions, the film's first audience was the community involved in making the film. The following month producers also screened the film in Puvirnituq, Nunavik, where the film was shot.

    Before Tomorrow was released in Canada by Alliance Motion Picture Distribution and Alliance Vivafilm in March 2009. Before Tomorrow is distributed internationally by Isuma Distribution International. U.S. premiere was a two-week run at Film Forum in New York December 2-15, 2009.The film now is available for Video-on-Demand download in standard definition or full HD from

    Before Tomorrow was produced in association with Alliance Atlantis, Alliance Vivafilm, Telefilm Canada, SODEC, the Nunavut Film Development Commission and with the support of NITV. With thanks to Makivik Corporation,First Air, and Air Inuit. Thanks also to the people and mayor's office of Puvirnituq, the Nunavik Arctic Survival Training Centre, Kativik school board, and the Cooperative of Puvirnituq for their support.

    The founding mandate of Igloolik Isuma Productions is to empower Inuit voices to tell their own stories. Isuma's first feature, Atanarjuat The Fast Runner, won the Camera d'or at Cannes 2001 and Best Picture at Canada's 2002 Genie Awards. Isuma's second feature, The Journals of Knud Rasmussen, opened the 2006 Toronto International Film Festival. Isuma's executive producers, Zacharias Kunuk and Norman Cohn, continue this mandate in Isuma's third feature film,  Before Tomorrow, the first written and produced by the Arnait Video Women's Collective.



  • Cara's Picks

    Cara's Picks

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    I really love videos and here are some of MY favorite videos from IsumaTV. Hand picked!

    IsumaTV hosts thousands of individual video, audio and text post uploaded by filmmakers and organizations from arround the world, as well as hosting unique multimedia projects.



  • Distribution


    by: John Hodgins

    These urls are direct links to 1080p h264 files for Isuma Productions. They can be copied (right-click and select "Copy Link Location") and pasted and emailed directly to authorized clients. These urls are specially encoded and stop working after 24 hours from the time you loaded this page. To generate new urls, simply refresh this page.

    This page is a private page and is visible only to it's members. Only people who are acting as distributors for Isuma Productions should have access to this page. Clients who are licensing these videos should be sent the appropriate download urls. They should not be given access to this page.

    getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'atn.hd.1080p.1.mp4', 86400); print l('Atanarjuat 1080p (english subtitles) part 1', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'atn.hd.1080p.2.mp4', 86400); print l('Atanarjuat 1080p (english subtitles) part 2', $link) . '

    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'jkr.hd.1080p.1.mp4', 86400); print l('JKR 1080p (english subtitles) part 1', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'jkr.hd.1080p.2.mp4', 86400); print l('JKR 1080p (english subtitles) part 2', $link) . '

    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'bt.hd.1080p.1.mp4', 86400); print l('BT 1080p (english subtitles) part 1', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'bt.hd.1080p.2.mp4', 86400); print l('BT 1080p (english subtitles) part 2', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'bt_es_1080.mp4', 86400); print l('BT 1080p (spanish subtitles)', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'bt_es_1080.mp4', 86400); print l('BT 1080p (french subtitles)', $link) . '

    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'tungijuq.1080p.mp4', 86400); print l('Tungijuq h264 (431MB)', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'tungijuq.1080p.mpg', 86400); print l('Tungijuq MPEG (1.2GB)', $link) . '

    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'ikcc.1080.mp4', 86400); print l('Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change (english subtitles) (2.6 GB)', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'ikcc_fr_1080.mp4', 86400); print l('Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change (french subtitles) (2.6 GB)', $link); ?>



  • First Online Film Festival 2015

    First Online Film Festival 2015

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    IsumaTV First Online Film Festival

    MARCH 2ND - APRIL 1ST 2015

    The IsumaTV First Online Film Festival brought international and remote viewers an exciting and engaging online program of indigenous feature films, documentaries and shorts.

    This first edition featured two world premieres by internationally acclaimed Inuit film director, Zacharias Kunuk; a fascinating selection from the TIFF Cinematheque; and a showcase collection of 40 Inuit films and videos, which remains available for streaming to IsumaTV viewers!

    Stay tuned for news on our second edition in 2016!



  • FPIC Forum

    FPIC Forum

    by: Rachel

    This symposium was an opportunity to discuss the importance of free, prior and informed consent, its status in Canadian and international law and its relevance in crucial decisions facing Indigenous peoples today.

    Watch all the archived discussions from May 20, 2015 here! 

    See the #FPICForum TwitterStorm here:

     Co-sponsored by Amnesty International, Assembly of First Nations, Canadian Friends Service Committee (Quakers), Grand Council of the Crees (Eeyou Istchee), Greenpeace Canada, KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives, MiningWatch Canada, Oxfam Canada, Oxfam Quebec, University of Ottawa Aboriginal Law Group, the Coalition for the Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and others. Thanks also to Alan Young and Peter Croal who worked on the organizational committee in their individual capacities.



  • IsumaTV Exclusive

    IsumaTV Exclusive

    by: IsumaTV

    IsumaTV and NITV present an exclusive channel with select films available to view online on IsumaTV. We are collaborating with a wide range of artists and filmmakers and are proud to host these shared works.



  • IsumaTV Highlights

    IsumaTV Highlights

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    Welcome to the IsumaTV Highlights channel where you can browse through some of the most fascinating uploads to IsumaTV!



  • IsumaTV HOW TO Guides

    IsumaTV HOW TO Guides

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    Here you can read useful PDF instruction guides to help you navigate and use IsumaTV.

    Prepared for you by your faithful IsumaTV Webmaster!



  • Montreal Radio

    Montreal Radio

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    Call in

    Share your perspective live via phone or Facebook!


    Comment on our page

    Live streaming schedule 

    09:00 – 12:0009:00 – 12:0009:00 – 12:00
    13:00 – 17:0013:00 – 17:0013:00 – 17:00


    Having trouble?

    • Error 2032? Radio is offline, CBC North is on.
    • Refresh page, try later. Internet may be too slow.
    • Update Adobe Flash Player




  • Qikiqtani Voices Radio

    Qikiqtani Voices Radio

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    Live Broadcast

    QIA Community Engagement Tour for Phase II of the Mary River Project.

    Airing in Arctic Bay, Clyde River, Hall Beach, Igloolik and Pond Inlet, and live streaming and archiving here.




    Live streaming schedule 



    Having trouble?

    • Error 2032? Radio is offline.
    • Refresh page, try later. Internet may be too slow.
    • Update Adobe Flash Player




  • Special Selection Inuit Films on IsumaTV

    Special Selection Inuit Films on IsumaTV

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    An exciting selection presented in collaboration with the Government of Nunavut Department of Culture and Heritage, showcasing 40 Inuit films hosted on IsumaTV, including youth projects, short films and award winning documentaries.



Recent Uploads


  • Arctic Bay Radio Online

    Arctic Bay Radio Online

    by: ArcticBayRadio

    Call in

    Share your perspective live via phone or Facebook!




    Live streaming schedule 



    QIA Community Engagement Tour 
    on the Mary River Iron Mine Project 

    Having trouble?

    • Error 2032? Radio is offline.
    • Refresh page, try later. Internet may be too slow.
    • Update Adobe Flash Player




  • Arnait Video Productions

    Arnait Video Productions

    by: Marie-Hélène Co...

    Inuit women's video collective, Igloolik

    Tungasugiti! Welcome!

    Before Tomorror - Ninioq and Maniq

    The women of Arnait have found that building connections to our traditions and, thereby, with the lives of our ancestors, gives shape and vitality to the lives we are leading and to the whole of the world we are sharing. Our inspiration is rooted in the past and blossoms in the present – to shine as an example for those around us. We invite you to discover the things we believe in and partake in the world view that sustains us.

    Find out more about Arnait and our work.

    Visit Our New Website


    Uvanga will play in Mexico

    UVANGA will be at the Festival Internacional de CIne de Guadalajara, Mexico in the Quebec, Guest of Honor selection. The festival takes place from March 21 until 30. The film will be in good company with about 15 other features from Quebec and a number of documentaries. 

    Uvanga premiers in Montréal and Toronto

    Uvanga is competing in the prestigious FOCUS section of the Festival du Nouveau Cinéma which features Quebecois and Canadian films that reflect the richness of emerging new cinema.

    The film will later screen in Toronto at the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival Closing Night Gala October 20th.


    Uvanga wins Best Feature at the Yellowknife International Film Festival

    Uvanga opened the 7th annual Yellownkife International Film Festival on October 1st with a screening at the Northern Arts and Culture Cenre.

    Uvanga was honered with the Best Feature award at the festival's first ever award ceremony held October 6th!




    Uvanga screening in home town Igloolik

    Uvanga screened on September 21th to an exited home town crowd in Igloolik! Much fun was had and reviews were positive!

    Next stop: Cinéfest Sudbury Intetnational Film Festival




    Production begins in Igloolik on Arnait's second feature

    Principal photography began July 9, 2012 on Uvanga. The film is co-directed by Marie-Hélène Cousineau and Madeline Piujuq Ivalu and will be shot entirely on location in Igloolik, Nunavut over the next 25 days.

    The film stars Montreal-based actress Marianne Farley and newcomer Lukasi Forrest.


    Before Tomorrow wins Best Canadian First Festure at TIFF 2008

    Before Tomorrow premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, September 7th. Other fall screenings include: Reykjavik International Film Festival, Festival du Nouveau Cinéma, imagineNATIVE festival, Pusan International Film Festival and the 33rd Annual American Indian Film Festival.

    And in October Arnait Video members will give a workshop at Trent University in Peterborough, connecting with Aboriginal women of Southern Ontario.


    Arnait premiers Before Tomorrow in Igloolik and Puvirnituq

     Igloolik premier

    Before Tomorrow premiered in Igloolik on February 23rd in 2008 and in Puvirnituq and Kujjuuaq on May 6-7-8. Members of the Arnait Video collective (Susan Avingaq, Madeline Ivalu, Carol Kunnuk et Marie-Hélène Cousineau) presented the film in front of attentive audiences. Props and select costumes from the film were also on display. As with previous films produced by Igloolik Isuma Productions, the film's first audience was the community involved in making the film.











  • Artcirq


    by: Artcirq

    Inuit youth circus/filmmaking collective

    Artcirq is an Inuit artistic collective based in Igloolik, Nunavut.

    Founded in 1998 to combat youth suicide with artistic opportunity, Artcirq has evolved into a community-based circus and multimedia organization, allowing northern and southern artists to bridge and meet in a meaningful and creative way.






    by: ARVIATTV

    Arviat TV channel.

    Created by Arviat Tarralijaarvik Film Society.

    Check out our website:



  • Cambridge Bay Television

    Cambridge Bay Television

    by: IsumaTV

    Local server Mediaplayers broadcast films from IsumaTV’s website to home viewers 24/7 by cable TV. Call or Facebook your Station Manager to comment or add any film or video you want to watch. Contact




  • Climate Changed World

    Climate Changed World

    by: UNUChannel

    Stories from a Climate Changed World

    Sharing indigenous perspectives

    A series of short videos produced by the  United Nations University, about the effects on climate change on indigenous communities in a variety of geographic regions.

    The UNU generates and shares knowledge on issues relevant to the promotion of human security and development, particularly in the developing countries.

    These videos were produced in collaboration with indigenous communities in Central Asia and the Pacific and the UNU-IAS Traditional Knowledge Initiative.

    This work forms part of the on-going Indigenous Peoples Climate-Change Assessment with financial support from The Christensen Fund and also with support from the UNU-VIE PALM Project.

    These stories are also showcased in the UNU's web magazine called Our World 2.0 that looks at the interconnected issues of climate change, peak oil, food security and biodiversity.



  • Clyde River Radio Online

    Clyde River Radio Online

    by: ClydeRiverRadio

    Call in

    Share your perspective live via phone or Facebook!




    Live streaming schedule 



    QIA Community Engagement Tour 
    on the Mary River Iron Mine Project 

    Having trouble?

    • Error 2032? Radio is offline.
    • Refresh page, try later. Internet may be too slow.
    • Update Adobe Flash Player




  • Digitizing Inuit Media Archives (DIMA)

    Digitizing Inuit Media Archives (DIMA)

    by: DIMA

    Digitizing Inuit Media Archives (DIMA) aims to identify, collect, restore, digitize, compress and upload Inuit media content online.

    The Nunavut Independent Television Network (NITV) in collaboration with IsumaTV will digitize 200 hours of existing, and irreplaceable, Inuit media content, insuring cultural information is not lost.

    These archives will be preserved online and easily available for consultation.

    View the full collection here as new material is regularly uploaded!

    Other Inuit content (uploaded since April 1, 2014):


    Nalluq: part 1, part 2, part 3

    Nanisiniq: A Journey of Discovery

    I, Nuligaq

    Interview with Terese Ijjangiaq

    Drum Dance Instructions/Jose Agutingurnirq

    Takuginai: S1, E1: Let's learn about caribou!

    Elder & youth seal hunt project, Taloyoak, NU




  • Hall Beach Radio Online

    Hall Beach Radio Online

    by: HallBeachRadio

    Call in

    Share your perspective live via phone or Facebook!

    ON-AIR +1-867-928-8899

    IN STUDIO: +1-867-928-8898




    Live streaming schedule 

    10:00-13:00 18:30-19:30 TBA


    QIA Community Engagement Tour 
    on the Mary River Iron Mine Project 

    Having trouble?

    • Error 2032? Radio is offline.
    • Refresh page, try later. Internet may be too slow.
    • Update Adobe Flash Player




  • Igloolik Radio Online

    Igloolik Radio Online

    by: IgloolikRadio

    Call in

    Share your perspective live via phone or Facebook!


    Comment on our page

    Live streaming schedule 

    10:00 – 13:3006:00 – 09:0013:00 – 18:00
    17:00 – 18:0010:00 – 12:0020:00 – 24:00
    20:00 – 22:00

    13:00 – 18:00

     20:00 – 24:00


    Having trouble?





  • imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival

    imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival

    by: imagineNATIVE F...

    imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival

    STAY TUNED! SUNDAY, OCT 23 at 7PM: imagineNATIVE presents the World Premiere and Closing Night film, WAPOS BAY: LONG GOODBYES right here on ISUMA.TV simultaneously as it is screened at the Festival in Toronto!



  • MICH Living Archives

    MICH Living Archives

    by: MICH

    Watch over 1,000 films by or about the Inuit. Collections include Igloolik Isuma Productions, Arnait Video Productions, Inuit Broadcast Corporation, among many others.

    Nunavut Arctic College students in Iqaluit are currently reviewing these videos, most of them in Inuktitut, and tagging them to facilitate improved search results for IsumaTV viewers, brodening the audience for these films.



  • My Father's Land

    My Father's Land

    by: Norman Cohn

    My Father's Land (Attatama Nunanga) by Zacharias Kunuk and Norman Cohn. 163 mins. Inuktitut and English, (c) Kingulliit Productions 2014. Mixing scenes from the past and present, My Father's Land (Attatama Nunanga) looks at the meanings between Inuit history and modern mining in North Baffin Island; how internet and new media can be used to inform and consult Inuit as Nunavut Impact Review Board (NIRB) holds Final Public Hearings on Baffinland's Mary River proposal to build the world's largest iron mine on Inuit land between Igloolik and Pond Inlet.

    see also and



  • Norman Cohn Video

    Norman Cohn Video

    by: Norman Cohn

    Norman Cohn's video work 1970-2015, channel in progress, stay tuned.



  • Pond Inlet Radio Online

    Pond Inlet Radio Online

    by: Gabriela Gamez

    Call in

    Main line: 867-899-8884

    2nd line: 867-899-8620



    Live streaming schedule 



    QIA Community Engagement Tour 
    on the Mary River Iron Mine Project 

    Having trouble?

    • Error 2032? Radio is offline.
    • Refresh page, try later. Internet may be too slow.
    • Update Adobe Flash Player




  • Video Nas Aldeias

    Video Nas Aldeias

    by: Video nas Aldeias

    Shorts and Videos from VNA

    Vídeo nas Aldeias (Video in the Villages) is an organization that provides video workshops for indigenous communities all over Brazil so they may have a voice of their own. The videos create dialogue between communities and with the outside world.



  • wanorazi yumneze

    wanorazi yumneze

    by: Troy Stozek

    wanorazi yumneze means “awakening spirit” in Lakota. Despite the challenges Indigenous people have endured and continue to face, the deep-rooted cultures, traditions, knowledge and communities are strengthening, awakening.

    Wanorazi yumneze (Awakening Spirit) is a documentary film that aims to begin a much needed conversation about how people, wildlife and the environment are impacted by industrial developments.

    The film is also a component of a larger research project underway among First Nations and the wider community in Canada. In Land and Life (ILAL) focused on cross-cultural education and information sharing between Western scientific and Indigenous circles.

    Download the film here or click on the media link bellow for Wanarozi Yumneze (Awakening Spirit)



Coming soon...
Coming soon...