traditional knowledge

Land Use and Adaptation

Indigenous peoples’ resilience is rooted in traditional knowledge and their deep understanding of the land.

For indigenous peoples, resilience is rooted in traditional knowledge, as their capacity to adapt to environmental change is based first and foremost on in-depth understanding of the land.

As climate change increasingly impacts indigenous landscapes, communities are responding and adapting in unique ways.

United Nations University (2012)

 

Traditional Knowledge & Climate Science

Video Series where Science and Traditional Knowledge meet to respond to climate change.

With deep connections to nature, the world's indigenous people and local communities are experiencing some of the most pronounced effects of climate change. This video series focuses on some of the key links between traditional knowledge and science regarding climate change.

Video sub-titles are also available in Spanish, French, Portuguese and Russian

www.unutki.org

Inuit Architecture: Ancient wisdom, future survival

 Inuit Architecture, including the iglu and qarmaq, continue to be useful in the north as survival shelters. Buildings from Inuit tradition are also important ways of knowing about snow and the land. This video was made with the support of Climate Change and Health Adaptation Program for Northern First Nations and Inuit Communities, Dr.

00910RI+Inu-90-10-Inuk

Program name: Inuusivut
Producer: Rankin Inlet - Inuit Broadcasting Corporation
Host: Emily Karetak
Segment 1: This is a documentary about the mining days in Rankin Inlet, Nunavut and where they dumped garbage near the shoreline.
Segment 2: Elder Prime Okalik from Whale Cove, Nunavut talks about hunting and weather.

01059RI+Takuj-94-33-Inuk

Program name: Takujuminaqtut / Takuyuminaqtut
Producer: Rankin Inlet - Broadcasting Corporation
Host: Charlie Panigoniak
Segment 1: Students go ice fishing with their teacher.
Segment 2: Students in Rankin Inlet show what they can do. Some of them play musical instruments, others sing songs, read in Inuktitut or dance.

01053RI+Inu-91-13-Inuk

Program name: Inuusivut
Producer: Rankin Inlet - Broadcasting Corporation
Host: Emily Karetak
Segment 1: Elizabeth Okalik teaches the traditional way to tan caribou skins. This is the second video with Elizabeth on tanning.
Segment 2: Hugh and Ruth Tulurialik from Baker Lake sing.

00974RI+Vint-93-##-Inuk

Program name: Takujuminaqtut / Takuyuminaqtut
Producer: Arviat - Inuit Broadcasting Corporation
Host: Charlie Panigoniak
Camera: Michael Angalik
Interviewer: Bobby Suluk
Segment 1: Joe Qajajuaq Curley talks about his life story.
Segment 2: Eric Anoee talks about Inuit life and the changes that have happened over the years.

00971RI+Vint-93-##-Inuk

Vintage Rankin Inlet production
Producer: Arviat – Inuit Broadcasting Corporation
Host: Charlie Panigoniak
Segment 1: A caribou calf fetus with three legs.
Segment 2: Elder Peter Koomak describes the meaning of inukshuks.
Segment 3: Elder Matalie Uuniq talks about her life.
Segment 4: An Arviat Elder talks about ice formation.

00331IQ+Bak-93-##-Inuk

Program name: Inukshuk
Producer: Baker Lake – Inuit Broadcasting Corporation
Host: Jean Nukik
Segment 1: Simon Quinagnaq from Baker Lake teaches how to skin and clean a fox.

00330IQ+Inu-92-31-Inuk

Program name: Inukshuk
Producer: Rankin Inlet – Inuit Broadcasting Corporation
Host: Emily Karetak

Syndicate content