History

Ningiuq

In 2009, Rachel Uyarasuk, elder of the Inuit community of Igloolik (Nunavut), evokes the ancestors whose name she received at birth. She explains how this transmission ensured their return among the world of the living.

A film by Christin Merlhiot

France, 2014, 11 minutes, animation

Inuktitut with English & French subtitles

Inuit Cree Reconciliation

Zacharias Kunuk and Neil Diamond team up to research the events and historical impacts of an 18th century conflict between Inuit and Cree in Northern Québec.

Produced by Kingulliit Productions.

Screening Information:

Year:  2013

Genre:  Documentary

Length: 45 minutes

Language: Inuktitut & Cree (English subtitles)

Playlist Arviat Television

 UPDATED JANUARY 22 2016 BY JOHN MAIN

ADMINS - IF YOU MAKE CHANGES PLEASE CHANGE THIS DATE

MATNA

Wanorazi Yumneze (Awakening Spirit)

Documentary film about how people, wildlife and the environment are impacted by industrial developments in Alberta and Saskatchewan. More importantly, this film is about communicating the voices and concerns of Indigenous people, who are often left out of decision-making processes, yet are among those most impacted.

Directed by Troy Stozed

ᓂᐲᑦ ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ Dr. Zacharias Kunuk O.C. NIRB Formal Intervention Part 2 of 3, 4:32

ᓂᐲᑦ ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ Dr. Zacharias Kunuk O.C. Part 2, 4:32 June 4, 2012, Inuktitut, see also Part 1, see also Part 3, My Father's Land, Formal Intervention to NIRB Final Public Hearing, Mary River Project, (Oral Inuktitut) July 2012; Dr. Zacharias Kunuk film maker, hunter, grandfather talks about growing up and his introduction to films and film making and his Inuk Point of View on mining and development in his father's land.

 

A Changing World

On Baffin Island, two mountains of ore will be cut down at Mary River. Some residents of Igloolik react to this development : they worry that this industrial development will destroy their environment and the marine mammals as well as their culture and hunting life style.

Uma História dos Krenak (A History of the Krenak) Trailer

HELP WANTED! This group seeks help to to protect its land, language and culture. Contact: <krenak31 [at] hotmail [dot] com>

Tracking Change

 Tracking Change… is a new research initiative funded by the Social Sciences Humanities Research Council of Canada and led by the University of Alberta, the Traditional Knowledge Steering Committee of the Mackenzie River Basin Board, the Government of the Northwest Territories and many other valued partner organizations. Over six years (2015-2022), the project will fund local and traditional knowledge research activities in the Mackenzie River basin and sister projects in the Lower Amazon and Lower Mekong River Basins, with the long term goal of strengthening the voices of subsistence fishers and Indigenous communities in the governance of major fresh water ecosystems. The project developed in recognition that river systems are important social, economic, cultural and ecological places that contribute to the well-being of communities in diverse ways. River peoples, particularly Indigenous peoples who have well developed fishing livelihoods can offer extremely valuable insights about long term (historic and current) patterns of social and ecological change and the interconnections between the health and dynamics of these river systems and that of river communities. Although based on oral traditions, this system of observation or “tracking change” is much like monitoring. Like those who live on Canada’s east and west coasts, the ability of Indigenous communities in the Mackenzie River Basin to maintain fishing as a livelihood practice is of social, economic and cultural importance to all of Canada; if this river system is not healthy, how can we be?

Fishers have been tracking change in the same places, in the same ways, using the same signs & signals for many generations. Such traditional knowledge is key to our understanding of many kinds of issues resulting from resource development, climate change and other land uses. This tracking of change is not simply a technical process; people watch, listen, learn and communicate about change because they care about the health of the land and the health of their communities.

Filmmaking Guide Part 4 - Documentary interviews

I share some of my interview techniques: being clear with people why I am filming this story;  asking the same questions to all the people I interview; filming beauty and action shots to edit with the interviews.

00420IQ+Inu-1991-17-Inuk

 IBC IGLOOLIK PRODUCTION

Ilisaut program interviewing local and a segment about prospecting walruses.

1- Interview Mr. & Mrs. Francois and Annie Kappianaq about Inuit traditional lyrics call Pisiq (ajajaa) songs on how they use to make song and talked about his one song as both are singing ajaja

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