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  • Thank You

    by: David Ertel

    channel: About ARTCO

    Funding Agencies and Partners

    This project is possible with the support of: Canada Media Fund, Isuma TV, Centre d'Etudes Nordiques Whapmagoostui-Kuujjuarapik Research Station and Air Inuit.

     

    16-01-2013

  • Today – expanding the model

    by: David Ertel

    channel: About ARTCO

    Based on our experience in Kuujjuarapik – Whapmagoostui and following our internal evaluation, we designed a new and better website and an iPod application that are better adapted to the ARTCO objectives and the children’s needs.

    02-01-2013

  • Collaboration with ‘Healing through Art’ project

    by: David Ertel

    channel: About ARTCO

    After the workshops first organized by ARTCO and the exhibition, our first partnership is with Patricia Falope who organized a series of workshops in the Inuit school of Kuujjuarapik - Whapmagoostui.

    The objective of Healing Through Art was to help children adopt positives outlets for coping with stress and difficult life situations including through acting, music and laughter and to teach them positive avenues for self-expression. Inuit children receive workshops in Hip-Hop, DJ mixing and Egyptian dance.

    Children who had previously participated in ARTCO record the workshops and upload the videos to the ARTCO platform. Glen Tookalook, a child who participated actively in ARTCO, is of great help to make this possible, by helping other children to record and upload their videos and photos.

    02-01-2013

  • Exhibition at Kuujjuarapik – Whapmagoostui

    by: David Ertel

    channel: About ARTCO

    Our original plan is to curate a virtual exhibition of the project. Once we started working in the community we realize that to better serve the project’s objectives and for the children’s benefit, it is more important to have a physical exhibition.

    After a curatorial process, the best pictures and videos made by the children are selected for the exhibition. About 150 photographs (a mix of both pictures and video stills) are printed in 8x10 format and exposed. An ARTCO booklet is created which lists all the participants, the community they belong to, their role, stills from their videos and a personal note for the children about their work from the curator.

    A playlist with a selection of the best films and pictures of each of the participants is played, in a loop, on television screens and video projectors.

    The printed pictures, television monitors and projected images were placed at a low height so children can see them properly: an exhibition made by children for the children.

    Along with the static part of the exhibition a performance by the children is given. This is the moment were Inuit and Cree children physically meet and work together. Children draw a giant whale on the gym floor with tape and placed different instruments along the whale. The community of Kuujjuarapik – Whapmagoostui is represented by the whale in their English, French and Cree names: Great Whale River in English, Poste de la Bailene in French, and literally “Place of the Beluga” in Cree. The children each have one instrument and produce a sound, receive a sound, pass a sound, direct the orchestra, play together or keep silent. Inuit and Cree had drawn their own whale at school and did the same exercise with their classmates. At the rehearsal and the exhibition they do it with the other children group of children.

    At the end, there is a permanent sound installation where children are able to play with instruments and sounds as well as a performance made by the music workshop artist.

    Children spend a long time in front of the television watching videos of their friends but also the videos of the other group of children (either Cree or Inuit) and commenting on the videos. In many cases the Cree and the Inuit children know each other, either because they are of mixed blood or because of other situations.

    The ARTCO exhibition booklet is precious to them. Some children of seven or eight years old cover their booklets with their t-shirt, very carefully putting them inside their jackets to protect them before going outside into the snow storm. No adult suggests this. Somehow these booklets are treated as if they are sacred. We expect to see a lot of booklets in the gym, on the floor, just left behind. Yet we see not one single booklet left behind. Even children who are not ARTCO participants come and ask for a booklet and then for a t-shirt. They love looking at the pictures the others kids have made.

    02-01-2013

  • Music Workshop

    by: David Ertel

    channel: About ARTCO

    Inuit and Cree children receive a sound exploration and recording workshop. Each group uses their iPods to record sounds of their own culture and play with them in funny, creative and innovative ways.

    In this workshop the artist creates a certain dynamic where children practice listening and emotional awareness.

    The artist provokes sound conversations between children through the creation of a ‘sound language’, and discusses the differences between speaking one language and listening to a language you do not understand.

    Throughout the workshop children also learn how to lead a team. They experience how to be in command and guide the others. By playing instruments, each child learns how to make eye contact before making a sound with an instrument and to make sure the rest will follow.

    02-01-2013