mining in nunavut

  • What’s in Mary River’s IIBA? A plain language summary, baffinlandwitness.com, July 3, 2012

    uploaded by: samcc

    chaîne: My Father's Land

    Full story at baffinlandwitness.com. Last Tuesday, QIA negotiator Paul Quassa spoke over Igloolik community radio to summarize the 24-article Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement (IIBA) offer the association made to Baffinland earlier this month. QIA expects to receive an answer from the mining company within the next month. Negotiations on the IIBA must be completed before the Nunavut Impact Review Board (NIRB) can make a recommendation on whether the mine should go ahead to the minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development. Quassa’s summary is translated below.

    CLICK HERE for the complete summary.

    En savoir plus

    uploaded date: 03-07-2012

  • Q&A with Igloolik mayor Nick Arnatsiaq, baffinlandwitness.com, June 28, 2012

    uploaded by: samcc

    chaîne: My Father's Land

    Full story at baffinlandwitness.com. BW: You’ve been mayor of Igloolik since January. Can you tell me a little bit about your background? NA: My real profession is interpreter-translator—I had a private business as an interpreter-translator in Iqaluit—but I’ve been many things. I was executive assistant for the Baffin Region Council, I worked in Ottawa as an assistant editor for an Inuktitut magazine and as an interpreter for ITC, also when I lived down south. In Igloolik, I was economic development officer, president of the Co-op and was vice-deputy mayor some years ago. And I’ve been Baffinland’s community liaison officer here for five years now.

    CLICK HERE for the complete interview.

    En savoir plus

    uploaded date: 28-06-2012

  • “I thought I would grow old there. I even have my gravesite up there.” Michelline Ammaq interview baffinlandwitness.com June 21, 2012

    uploaded by: samcc

    chaîne: My Father's Land

    Full story at baffinlandwitness.com. "When I was a child, we would live out on the land. And I grew up on Baffin, where there were always mountains around us. I loved Baffin because it has colour, it has landscape. It has plants you can eat, not just plants you can see, and we picked and ate blueberries and blackberries there all summer."

    CLICK HERE for the complete interview

    En savoir plus

    uploaded date: 21-06-2012

  • Q&A with Zacharias Kunuk baffinlandwitness.com June 13, 2012

    uploaded by: samcc

    chaîne: My Father's Land

    Full Story at baffinlandwitness.com. "I want to film the area, I want to film the wildlife, I want to film the port site, Ikpikitturjuaq, which everybody is talking about. Then I came up with a documentary and put a new title on it, My Father’s Land. Just take people out, take them back to the land where they used to live and talk about what they did, what was going on there. So it’s all connected. We’re trying to let people talk; talk about what they think because mining is all around us."

    CLICK HERE to read the article.

    En savoir plus

    uploaded date: 13-06-2012

  • UPDATE TONIGHT JUNE 6 RADIO CALL-IN – Nipivut Nunatinnii Our Voice at Home

    uploaded by: samcc

    chaîne: DID News

    UPDATE TONIGHT Wednesday June 6th 8-10pm: Walrus, Wildlife and Baffinland?
    • What do hunters think about Baffinland’s supertankers and marine mammals?
    • Will shipping through Foxe Basin damage the wildlife? Is it safe?

    Thursday June 7th 8-10pm: Have Inuit Had Their Say?
    • Do you understand Baffinland’s Environmental Impact Statement?
    • Are you informed? Do your opinions count?

    Listen at Live Radio  Call-in 1.819-934-8080, or 8082.

    Get your opinions on the record.
    Call-in radio shows will be submitted to NIRB July Public Hearings as part of DID’s Formal Intervention led by Zacharias Kunuk and human rights lawyer Lloyd Lipsett

    En savoir plus

    uploaded date: 06-06-2012

  • QIA shows some support for Steensby Inlet port

    uploaded by: samcc

    chaîne: DID News

    In their final intervention to the NIRB, QIA has shown their support for the Mary River project. They stated that, “QIA feels that appropriate mechanisms are in place to effectively monitor and manage the Mary River Project in an acceptable manner.” However they also have concerns.… En savoir plus

    uploaded date: 05-06-2012

  • LISTEN TONIGHT MAY 30th 8PM - Nipivut Nunatinnii live Call-in radio online, QIA report by Zacharias Kunuk

    uploaded by: samcc

    chaîne: DID News

    Tune in TONIGHT, May 30, from 8-10 pm EST to listen to the next online call-in radio show in the series Nipivut Nunatinnii Our Voice at Home, broadcast locally and worldwide by Igloolik Community Radio Online at www.isuma.tv/DID/radio/igloolik. Zacharias Kunuk, Igloolik Hamlet Councilor and representative to the Board of Qikiqtani Inuit Association (QIA), will make his first radio report to the community following the recent QIA Board meetings. Two phone lines will be open for call-in questions and comments at +1-867-934-8080 and -8082. Questions and comments also can be submitted on Facebook at www.facebook.com/radiostation.igloolik

     

    Let your voices be heard!

    Nipivut Nunatinnii Our Voice at Home Igloolik Community Radio Online +1.867.934.8080 or 8082 www.facebook.com/radiostation.igloolik or www.facebook.com/isumaTV

     

    En savoir plus

    uploaded date: 30-05-2012

  • Mining and caribou - What is a "significant impact"

    uploaded by: samcc

    chaîne: Show me on the map: discussions on mining on Aboriginal lands

    DID News Alert Mining and caribou– What is a “significant impact”?

    On May 21st, the Baker Lake Hunters and Trappers Organization made public a paper written in response to AREVA’s (a French mining company) Environmental Impact Statement for their proposed “Kiggavik” uranium mine near Baker Lake.

    They were concerned with the results of the DEIS concerning the effect of the proposed mine on local caribou population, and saw some problems with what AREVA considered was a “significant impact” when it came to the caribou population. For example, any impact that does not affect the population as a whole on the long-term is not considered significant. But this does not take into account the location of the herd. So if the herd population stays somewhat the same, but they stop coming to the Baker Lake region, the impact is not significant. But for the people of Baker Lake, this would be a very significant impact. This scientific approach does not seem to take into account the social impact of a change in caribou population. In their impact statement, AREVA says that the mine will only significantly impact caribou migration if 10% or more of the caribou population does not reach the calving grounds. But the report does not take into account how migration will be affected specifically around Baker Lake. AREVA does not seem to be bothered by this, claiming that caribou herds are constantly moving, and so Inuit should just adjust their hunting habits.

    They said that AREVA did not really take into account Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit (IQ) as much as they would have liked. In the report, they claim AREVA only focused on information about hunting and wildlife, but did not investigate Inuit values and “what sort of future Inuit want for themselves.” This is a very important part of IQ, and if AREVA really valued the importance of IQ, according to the Baker Lake Hunters and Trappers Organization, they should have focused more on this specific point. They also found that IQ was not really used when it came to study caribou population and migration. Instead AREVA focused only on scientific studies and collar data.

    AREVA claim that they are respecting IQ ways, but the Baker Lake Hunters and Trappers Organization feel that this approach shows that AREVA does not really respect the situation of Baker Lake Inuit and their hunting traditions. They believe more of an effort must be made to consult elders and people from the community when it comes to caribou population, and that a better balance of scientific data and consultation and respect for Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit will bring better results.

    With the Baffinland/NIRB July hearings fast approaching, the question of how to assess wildlife impact seems more important now than ever before.

    Click to your left (under "attached files") for a PDF file of the Baker Lake Hunters And Trappers document.

    En savoir plus

    uploaded date: 29-05-2012

  • Baffinland community hearings – Who are the community representatives?

    uploaded by: samcc

    chaîne: My Father's Land

    DID News Alert  May 28, 2012. With the July community hearings coming soon, Baffinland presented a document called “"What to Expect When You Are Expecting," on May 3rd in Iqaluit. In this document, the company explains how the public hearings will take place. At the community hearings, there will be TWO types of intervenors.

    1) Formal Intervenors: According to this document, formal intervenors must present a written submission to the NIRB by May 30th and wait to be approved. If approved, then these formal intervenors will be able to present their documents to the full NIRB board on the first day of community meetings, which is the technical presentations. These presentations, and the NIRB’s response, will be put on the official publicrecord.

    2) Informal Intervenors: This is everyone else. People from the community who have not filed a written submission to be a formal intervenor will still be able, according to the NIRB, to speak to some members of the board and ask questions and raise their concerns about the project. This is what is called the “community roundtables.” They will take place on the second and third day of the hearings. They will be open to anyone, so people do not have to be approved in order to come and talk.

    What does not seem clear from the NIRB guidelines, is whether the community roundtables will be recorded or put on the official public record. The formal intervenors will, and their questions will be put on record. But for the rest of the community, those who have not made written submissions but still have lots of questions or concerns they want to express to the NIRB board, it is not clear if any of what they say will be recorded in the official transcript. Will their opinions and concerns be lost?

    It is also not clear what the NIRB means by “community representatives.” In the document “What to Expect When You Are Expecting,” it says on page 14 that "The NIRB will be soliciting up to five (5) representatives from each of the 11 communities to attend the Final Hearing in Iqaluit." Some sources say there are 7 communities that will be represented at the final Iqaluit hearing, not 11. This is confusing.

    ALSO, this document does not explain how the NIRB will be selecting these representatives, or where they will be coming from. If they are not selected by the NIRB, then what organization will be selecting them? The Mary River Projects Committee? The Hamlet Council? QIA?

    This last question is important, since the people of the communities should know who will represent their town at the final Iqaluit hearings.

    Look to your left (under "attached files") to download a PDF version of the Baffinland presentation "What to Expect When You Are Expecting"

    En savoir plus

    uploaded date: 28-05-2012