Stéphane Rituit

Profil

Portrait de Stéphane Rituit

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Communautés

  • Igloolikmiut Community Page

    Igloolikmiut Community Page

    par: IsumaTV

    Igloolik is a Low Bandwidth High Cost internet community. Internet service is 150 times behind southern Canada in cost-per-MB. To overcome this handicap DID installs local server Mediaplayers to deliver high speed media to slow speed users, and broadcasts our internet films and videos to home TV.

    13-12-2011

    24208 views

Recent Uploads

Chaînes

  • Alianait Arts Festival 2008

    Alianait Arts Festival 2008

    par: Stéphane Rituit

    Music and Arts festival from Iqaluit, Nunavut

    Created in 2005, Alianait! Arts Festival is one of the biggest cultural events in Nunavut celebrating and connecting cultures through music and arts.

    29-06-2008

    6725 views

    Anglais

  • Alianait Arts Festival 2009

    Alianait Arts Festival 2009

    par: John Hodgins

    Created in 2005, Alianait! Arts Festival is one of the biggest cultural events in Nunavut celebrating and connecting cultures through music and arts.

    IsumaTV will broadcast the Alianait Arts Festival live - June 21 to July 1 - everyday from 07PM to 10PM on www.isuma.tv

    The Festival will kick off on June 21, 2009, National Aboriginal Day, with a free afternoon show which will feature throat singers from Nunavut and Nunavik, Ellen Hamilton & Friends, Johnny Issaluk and the Inuksuk High School Choir.

    The Alianait Opening Concert will follow on June 22nd with:

    • Maanilu Asianilu, a youth Brazilian drumming group from Kangiqsujuak
    • Naujamiut, a traditional Inuit band from Repulse Bay
    • The Bop Ensemble – featuring Canadian folk Shaman Bill Bourne, Wyckham Porteous & Jas Olhauser from Alberta & British Columbia www.billbourne.com/bopensemble.htm
    • Treasa Levasseur, a smoldering singer-songwriter originally from Winnipeg, backed by guitarist David Baxter and a big sound 5 piece band from Toronto www.treasalevasseur.com
    • A fantastic Circus collaboration will be presented on Saturday, June 27th featuring Nunavut’s internationally acclaimed Artcirq and Productions Kalabante, an African / Quebecois circus troupe featuring Yamoussa Bangoura www.kalabante.org

    The Closing Concert on June 30, 2009 will feature:

    • Kaina Nowlak, Iqaluit’s favourite accordionist
    • Liima Inui, rock, reggae, world & pop musicians from Greenland just in time to release a new CD www.myspace.com/liimainui
    • Kobotown, a magic mix of calypso, dub poetry, roots reggae, folk and funk – Trinidad born now living in Toronto www.kobotown.com
    • Troy MacGillivray & Nuala Kennedy, award-winning Halifax fiddler www.troymacgillivray.com and enchanting Scottish flautist www.nualakennedy.com
    • Productions Kalabante, an amazing collaboration of jazz vocals and African drums www.kalabante.org

    Contact Info:

     

    For more details :
    http://www.alianait.ca/

    21-06-2009

    19347 views

    Inuktitut

  • Angel Street

    Angel Street

    par: IsumaTV

    This site is currently under construction. Please come back soon!

    19-11-2009

    6674 views

  • Before Tomorrow

    Before Tomorrow

    par: IsumaTV

    Theatrical trailer

    Film premiers in Igloolik

    After the screening, audience members had a chance to examine props and costumes used in the film.

    Shooting wrapped

    more photos from the set

    Watch teaser

    Before Tomorrow in the press

    Women's collective screens film for home town crowd by Sonia Gunderson, Nunatsiaq News February 29, 2008 (read article)

    Creating together: Igloolik and Puvirnituq co-operate on Isumas third feature film by Jim Bell, Nunatsiaq News January 19, 2007 (read article)

    On the set of Before Tomorrow by Isabelle Dubois, Inuktitut Magazine Fall 2006 (pdf)

    Marie-Hélène Cousineau: Filmer l'intimité et l'imensité by Denis Lord, Elle Québec January 2007 (pdf)

    Before Tomorrow

    New in March 2010! Nine Canadian Genie Award nominations including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Actor, Adapted Screenplay, Art Direction, Costumes, Sound, Original Song. Four Quebec Jutra Award nominations, Best Picture, Director, Costumes, Music.

    More About Film   /   View Film or Download

    A co-production of Igloolik Isuma Productions and Kunuk Cohn Productions, Before Tomorrow is the first feature film written and directed by Igloolik's Arnait Video Productions women's collective, which has been filming Inuit women's stories since 1991 based on cultural authenticity and community involvement.

    Before Tomorrow is directed by Marie-Hélène Cousineau and Madeline Ivalu from a script by Susan Avingaq, Marie-Hélène Cousineau and Madeline Ivalu, adapted from the novel For morgendagen by the acclaimed Danish writer Jørn Riel. It is produced by Stéphane Rituit, with executive producers Norman Cohn and Zacharias Kunuk. Leading the cast are Madeline Ivalu and her grandson Paul-Dylan Ivalu, joined by Mary Qulitalik, Peter-Henry Arnatsiaq and Tumasie Sivuarapik.

    Before Tomorrow is the story of a woman who demonstrates that human dignity is at the core of life from beginning to end, as she faces with her grandson the ultimate challenge of survival. The film was shot in remote locations near the community of Puvirnituq, Nunavik (norhtern Quebec) over four separate periods between July 2006 and January 2007 to capture the arctic seasons from June though December.

    Before Tomorrow premiered in Igloolik on the weekend of February 23-24, 2008. Members of the Arnait Video collective (Susan Avingaq, Madeline Ivalu, Carol Kunnuk and Marie-Hélène Cousineau) presented the film in front of attentive audiences in the school gym. Actors, props and select costumes from the film were also on display. As with previous films produced by Igloolik Isuma Productions, the film's first audience was the community involved in making the film. The following month producers also screened the film in Puvirnituq, Nunavik, where the film was shot.

    Before Tomorrow was released in Canada by Alliance Motion Picture Distribution and Alliance Vivafilm in March 2009. Before Tomorrow is distributed internationally by Isuma Distribution International. U.S. premiere was a two-week run at Film Forum in New York December 2-15, 2009.The film now is available for Video-on-Demand download in standard definition or full HD from isuma.tv/fastrunnertrilogy.

    Before Tomorrow was produced in association with Alliance Atlantis, Alliance Vivafilm, Telefilm Canada, SODEC, the Nunavut Film Development Commission and with the support of NITV. With thanks to Makivik Corporation,First Air, and Air Inuit. Thanks also to the people and mayor's office of Puvirnituq, the Nunavik Arctic Survival Training Centre, Kativik school board, and the Cooperative of Puvirnituq for their support.

    The founding mandate of Igloolik Isuma Productions is to empower Inuit voices to tell their own stories. Isuma's first feature, Atanarjuat The Fast Runner, won the Camera d'or at Cannes 2001 and Best Picture at Canada's 2002 Genie Awards. Isuma's second feature, The Journals of Knud Rasmussen, opened the 2006 Toronto International Film Festival. Isuma's executive producers, Zacharias Kunuk and Norman Cohn, continue this mandate in Isuma's third feature film,  Before Tomorrow, the first written and produced by the Arnait Video Women's Collective.

    03-03-2009

    47707 views

  • Bernard Saladin d'Anglure

    Bernard Saladin d'Anglure

    par: Stéphane Rituit

    Bernard Saladin d'Anglure
    Lauréat du Prix de la recherche scientifique sur le Nord

    Monsieur Bernard Saladin d'Anglure est né en France, en mai 1936. Il a reçu sa maîtrise en anthropologie de l'Université de Montréal en 1964, puis son doctorat en ethnologie de l'École pratique des hautes études de Paris en 1971. Au cours de ses travaux de doctorat, il a fait plusieurs voyages de recherche au Canada en plus de travailler comme assistant auprès du célèbre anthropologue Claude Lévi-Strauss.

    En 1956, il a obtenu une bourse de la Fondation nationale des bourses Zellidja en France, qui lui a permis de faire un bref séjour au Canada, plus précisément au Nunavik. Au cours de ce voyage, M. Saladin d'Anglure a colligé des données démographiques et ethnographiques et réalisé un documentaire qui a été primé. Il a aussi découvert sa passion : faire progresser les connaissances sur les Inuit et les diffuser en recourant à des moyens audiovisuels.

    Après avoir obtenu son doctorat, le professeur Saladin d'Anglure a élargi la portée de ses recherches pour se pencher sur le chamanisme et l'organisation politique. Chaque année, il a voyagé au Nunavik et au Nunavut, notamment à Igloolik et sur l'île de Baffin. Il a aussi visité occasionnellement le Labrador, le Groënland, l'Alaska ainsi que les Inuvialuit. Ces voyages lui ont permis de connaître à fond les peuples du Nord avec qui il a discuté de sujets traditionnels ou contemporains chez les Inuit.

    Monsieur Saladin d'Anglure a appris l'inuktitut qu'il parle couramment. Sa connaissance de la langue lui a ouvert les portes des peuples autochtones de l'Arctique et lui a permis de bien saisir les pratiques inuites. Afin de préserver la validité anthropologique et scientifique de ses travaux, et par respect envers les droits des Inuit, il a invité des Inuit à prendre part à ses travaux et leur a remis toutes les données qu'il avait colligées auprès d'eux. En 1974, M. Saladin d'Anglure a fondé l'Association Inuksiutiit Katimajiit Inc., une société canadienne sans but lucratif dont la principale mission était de remettre aux Inuit les données et les documents de recherche qu'il avait collectionnés, dont des cartes et des arbres généalogiques.

    En 1977, M. Saladin d'Anglure a lancé la publication scientifique d'envergure internationale Études Inuit Studies. Plusieurs dizaines de chercheurs et de lecteurs étrangers collaborent à cette publication qui est devenue une source précieuse de renseignements fiables sur les sciences sociales de l'Arctique.

    Le professeur Saladin d'Anglure a mis sur pied la conférence biennale et internationale sur les études inuites, qui est le principal forum de recherche sur les Inuit. Il a aussi fondé le Groupe d'études inuites et circumpolaires qui constitue le plus important centre de recherche sur les sciences sociales de l'Arctique.

    Tout au long de sa carrière, M. Saladin d'Anglure a joué un rôle de chef de file dans l'organisation, la promotion et la diffusion des connaissances scientifiques sur le Nord canadien. Sa passion d'en apprendre toujours davantage sur les Inuit et de partager ses connaissances avec le monde entier l'a poussé à constituer une imposante collection de documents écrits, audio et visuels qui est appréciée partout au monde. Le professeur Saladin d'Anglure jouit d'une réputation internationale de pionnier dans le domaine des études inuites en raison de ses innombrables et inestimables contributions.

    source: http://classiques.uqac.ca/contemporains/saladin_danglure_bernard/saladin_danglure_photo/saladin_danglure_photo.html

     

    Bernard Saladin d'Anglure
    Northern Science Award Winner

    Professor Bernard Saladin d'Anglure was born in France in May 1936. In 1964, he received his masters degree from the Department of Anthropology at the Université de Montréal. He received his PhD in Ethnology from the École Pratique des Hautes Études in 1971 in Paris. During his PhD studies, he made several research trips to Canada and was assistant to the renowned anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss.

    In 1956, he earned a scholarship from the Fondation Nationale des Bourses Zellidja (France) that brought him to Canada for a short visit to Nunavik. On this trip, Professor Saladin d'Anglure gathered demographic and ethnographic data and made an award-winning documentary film. He also discovered his passion: to advance knowledge of the Inuit and to share this knowledge with others through the use of audiovisual material.

    After obtaining his PhD, Professor Saladin d'Anglure broadened his scope of research to include shamanism and political organization. Yearly visits to Nunavik and Nunavut, including Igloolik and Baffin Island, and occasional visits to Labrador, the Inuvialuit, Greenland and Alaska allowed him to remain attuned to the people of the North, with whom he discussed topics related to traditional and contemporary Inuit thought.

    Professor Saladin d'Anglure learned to speak Inuktitut fluently and his knowledge of the language gave him access to the Aboriginal people of the Arctic and a deeper understanding of Inuit practices. To maintain a scientifically valid anthropology and out of respect for Inuit rights, he involved the Inuit in his research and turned over to them the data gathered from them. In 1974, Professor Saladin d'Anglure founded the Association Inuksiutiit Katimajiit Inc., a Canadian non-profit society whose primary purpose was to return to the Inuit the research data, such as land use maps and family trees, that he had collected.

    In 1977, Professor Saladin d'Anglure established the international journal of Inuit studies, Études Inuit Studies which has dozens of international contributors and readers, and has become a valued source of high quality information about Arctic social sciences.

    Professor Saladin d'Anglure launched the biennial international Inuit Studies Conference, a premier venue for the reportage of Inuit research. He also founded the Inuit and circumpolar studies group (GÉTIC), Canada's leading Arctic social sciences research centre.

    Throughout his career, he has been a leader in organizing, promoting and broadcasting scientific knowledge of the Canadian North. His passion to learn about the Inuit and to share this knowledge with the world has resulted in a rich compilation of written, recorded and visual data that is valued throughout the world. For all his contributions, Professor Saladin d'Anglure is recognized internationally as a pioneer in the field of Inuit studies.

    16-12-2009

    7912 views

  • Bringing it Back to the Inuit: Zacharias Kunuk for President of QIA

    Bringing it Back to the Inuit: Zacharias Kunuk for President of QIA

    par: Zacharias Kunuk

    Zach's Platform in Inuktitut | Click HERE for Radio Version (faster download)

    Zacharias Kunuk

    More Videos

    Zach's Views in Inuktitut & English

    Zacharias Kunuk

    QIA Platform

    Bringing it Back to the Inuit

    Zacharias Kunuk

    About Zacharias

    More about the candidate.

    VIDEO above in Inuktitut; TEXT below in English

    "My name is Zacharias Kunuk; I was born on the land near Igloolik in Kapuivik on Baffin Island side in 1957. Before I was sent to school, before the age of nine, I saw how we used to live. Sod houses, ice porch and traveling by dog team, Stories I heard at bedtime, I even started to go out with the men, different dog teams. My world ended when I was sent to school in 1966. I got to grade eight; to get higher I had to leave my community which I didn’t want...."

    "We need to educate our Beneficiaries in what QIA was created to do. QIA protects Beneficiaries' rights as Inuit, more than governments of Canada or Nunavut ever can do. As our Regional Inuit Association, QIA should lead in preservation of Inuit Culture and Language, through, art, literature, music, TV, internet, education and promoting Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit, so future generations know who they are and where they came from. No one will preserve our culture for us, if we don’t do it ourselves...."

    Read complete English Platform...

    18-11-2009

    4571 views

    Inuktitut

  • ealat.tv

    ealat.tv

    par: boazu

    Welcome to the EALÁT TV channel.

    EALÁT is a Reindeer Herders Vulnerability Network Study and is a project that examines reindeer pastoralism in the light of climate change.

    Ealát is Sámi word with a multi layered meaning. Ealát signifies 'Pasture', but related words Eallu means 'Herd' while Eallin means 'Life' in the Sámi language. The primary research institution in EALÁT is the Sámi University College-Nordic Sámi Institute (SUC-NSI). A wide number of other research institutions are involved in the project, along with the Association of World Reindeer Herders(WRH) and the International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry. All are located in the heart of the Sámi region, Guovdageaidnu-Kautokeino, Norway.

    EALÁT focuses on the adaptive capacity of reindeer pastoralism to climate variability and change and, in particular, on the integration of reindeer herders' knowledge in the study and analysis of their ability to adapt to environmental variability and change.

    For more information visit www.ealat.org

     

    30-11-2009

    6977 views

  • IKCC Rough-Cut (Spring 2010)

    IKCC Rough-Cut (Spring 2010)

    par: Ian Mauro

    This "behind the scenes" channel allows Isuma to share the 90-minute IKCC rough-cut (completed spring 2010)

    18-05-2010

    3108 views

    Inuktitut

  • Inuit Cree Warfare

    Inuit Cree Warfare

    par: Stéphane Rituit

    "Inuit Cree Warfare" is the development/research title of one of Isuma's new feature film.

    We will share on this channel our researches and stories behind this part of our History.

    This project is led by: Zacharias Kunuk (Inuk), Ron Sheshamush (Cree) and Neil Diamond (Cree).

    We invite you to take part of this research. Feel free to contact us or post stories, web links, audiovisual commentaries, resources you want to share.

    06-08-2010

    6263 views

    Inuktitut

  • Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

    Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

    par: Ian Mauro

     

    COMMENT or DISCUSS the film

    Video on Demand

    Download in SD

    Download in 720p HD

    Download in 1080p HD

    BOOK A SCREENING, rent or buy the film from Vtape +1.416.351.1317 email wandav@vtape.org.

    About the film

    Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change had its world premiere October 23, 2010, at the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival in Toronto. The complete film also streamed online simultaneously watched by more than 1500 viewers around the world. Following the film, a Q&A with filmmakers Zacharias Kunuk and Dr. Ian Mauro included live call-in by Skype from viewers from Pond Inlet, New York, Sydney, Australia and other locations.

    Nunavut-based director Zacharias Kunuk (Atanarjuat The Fast Runner) and researcher and filmmaker Dr. Ian Mauro (Seeds of Change) have teamed up with Inuit communities to document their knowledge and experience regarding climate change. This new documentary, the world’s first Inuktitut language film on the topic, takes the viewer “on the land” with elders and hunters to explore the social and ecological impacts of a warming Arctic. This unforgettable film helps us to appreciate Inuit culture and expertise regarding environmental change and indigenous ways of adapting to it.

    READ MORE
    Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change had its world premiere October 23, 2010, at the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival in Toronto. The complete film also streamed online simultaneously watched by more than 1500 viewers around the world. Following the film, a Q&A with filmmakers Zacharias Kunuk and Dr. Ian Mauro included live call-in by Skype from viewers from Pond Inlet, New York, Sydney, Australia and other locations.

     

    Nunavut-based director Zacharias Kunuk (Atanarjuat The Fast Runner) and researcher and filmmaker Dr. Ian Mauro (Seeds of Change) have teamed up with Inuit communities to document their knowledge and experience regarding climate change. This new documentary, the world’s first Inuktitut language film on the topic, takes the viewer “on the land” with elders and hunters to explore the social and ecological impacts of a warming Arctic. This unforgettable film helps us to appreciate Inuit culture and expertise regarding environmental change and indigenous ways of adapting to it.

    Exploring centuries of Inuit knowledge, allowing the viewer to learn about climate change first-hand from Arctic residents themselves, the film portrays Inuit as experts regarding their land and wildlife and makes it clear that climate change is a human rights issue affecting this ingenious Indigenous culture. Hear stories about Arctic melting and how Inuit believe that human and animal intelligence are key to adaptability and survival in a warming world.

    Community-based screenings of the film are now being organized across Canada. Stay tuned for more information, new blog posts and videos added to this channel regularly.

    Please feel free to contact us should you like to organize a screening in your area. Email us: isuma@isuma.ca.

    LESS INFO
     

    29-04-2009

    219406 views

    Inuktitut

  • Kingulliit The Next Generation Blog

    Kingulliit The Next Generation Blog

    par: IsumaTV

    Kingulliit The Next Generation Blog is a Related Channel to the site Kingulliit The Next Generation. This related channel documents activities in 2010 and 2011 to move Inuktitut-language multimedia into a new generation of production and distribution through new media and new internet technologies. Starting November 2010, Inuit filmmaker Zacharias Kunuk leads a team to Nunavut communities to show how IsumaTV Hi-speed MediaPlayers boost slow internet to high-speed for over 2000 films on www.isuma.tv. Kunuk also screens in each community his newest documentary film, Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change, by downloading it from the internet using a Hi-speed MediaPlayer. Kunuk travels with Paul Quassa, former president of Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., Canadian rock-star Lucie Idlout and Nunavut filmmaker, David Poisey, to introduce the potential benefits of faster internet for watching over 720 films in Inuktitut among a total of 2000 Inuit and Aboriginal films in 41 languages worldwide. John Hodgins, IsumaTV Technical Manager, installs the Hi-speed MediaPlayers in schools, libraries, youth centres or other locations where people can gain access to IsumaTV’s collection, and where local community videos can be uploaded to the worldwide website. This blog follows the process of their travels and results. Please join us to upload comments, suggestions, videos, photos or other materials relating to bringing Inuit and Aboriginal media out of the past and into the digital future.

    25-11-2010

    8211 views

  • Live from the Floe Edge

    Live from the Floe Edge

    par: IsumaTV

    Live from the Floe Edge
    From an Inuit Point of View

    directed by Zacharias Kunuk
    for www.isuma.tv

    co-production of
    Igloolik Isuma Productions Inc
    Kunuk Cohn Productions Inc

    Produced with the financial participation of
    Government of Nunavut
    and
    Nunavut Film

    Live from the Floe Edge: From an Inuit Point of View is the world's first Inuit film produced expressly for distribution through the internet.

    Led by Igloolik Isuma Productions founder, Zacharias Kunuk, Canada's foremost northern filmmaker, Live from the Floe Edge uses Isuma's new video website www.isuma.tv as a global media platform for Inuit to speak through the internet to the future as they see it.

    Live from the Floe Edge is the first film, the first chapter of a production series to be distributed on IsumaTV throughout 2008-2010, presenting the view from the Inuit side of environmental issues, climate change and social, cultural and human rights challenges facing the arctic homeland in the 21st century.

    IsumaTV presents this unique, innovative and extraordinary filmmaking process through the internet.

    Directed by:
    Zacharias Kunuk

    Produced by:
    Zacharias kunuk - Stephane Rituit

    Executive Producer:
    Norman Cohn, Zacharias Kunuk

    Camera
    Zacharias Kunuk, Paul Irngaut, Qajaaq Ellsworth, 40 Below Film Services

    Sound
    Aaron Kunuk

    Editing
    Carol Kunnuk

    Consultant
    Lucie Idlout, Qajaaq Ellsworth, Stephanie Silliker

    Production Managers
    Krista Uttak, Paul Quassa

    Production Assistants
    Lucy Tulugarjuk, Oana Spinu, Michelline Ammaq, Eric Nutarariaq, Brian Nutarariaq

    Production Assistants/ Camp Helpers
    Sandy Quassa, Joshua Kunuk, Paul Uttak, Jayson Kunuk, Clara Koonoo, Lizzie Makkik

    Transportation crew / Guides
    Simon Qamaniq, David Irngaut, Peter Awa, Richard Ammaroitok, Hyppolite Immaroitok, Paul Quassa, Joshua Anguratsiaq, Dennis Apak, Laben Kunuk, Phoebe Kunuk, John Arnastiaq, Artcirq's collective

    Helpers
    Jayco Kunuk, Joshua Kunuk, Benjamin Kunuk, Artcirq's Collective

    Accountant
    Benoit Gauthier

    Audit
    Jocelyne Loiselle CA

    Original Language
    Inuktitut and English.

    Distribution
    www.isuma.tv

    04-06-2009

    10409 views

    Anglais

  • LIVE on IsumaTV from Igloolik, Nunavut to the COP15 Copenhagen Climate Change Conference

    LIVE on IsumaTV from Igloolik, Nunavut to the COP15 Copenhagen Climate Change Conference

    par: John Hodgins

    Program and schedule of the broadcast (time zone: EST, UTC -5 hours)

    12noon - 1pm: Live from Igloolik in the Canadian Arctic. Join Zacharias Kunuk, Dr Ian Mauro and elder Augustin Taqqaugaq for an active conversation about their recent work submitted to the United Nations Indigenous Voices on Climate Change Film Festival in Copenhagen, Denmark. Audience is invited to join Zach and Ian through Skype using their Skype ID: InuitKNowledgeAndClimateChange .

    1pm - 2pm: Siila Watt-Cloutier's Lecture delivered in May 2009 in Iqaluit as part of the 9th Lafontaine-Baldwin Symposium. Siila is a renowned Canadian Inuit activist and she launched the world's first international legal action on climate change. You can see the interviews on which the legal action was based at this address: http://www.isuma.tv/international-legal-action-climate-change

    2pm - 3pm: Live from Igloolik in the Canadian Arctic. Join Zacharias Kunuk and  Dr Ian Mauro in an engaging conversation about Inuit knowledge and climate change with elder Augustin Taqqaugaq and invitees joining in on Skype. Audience is invited to join Zach and Ian through Skype using their Skype ID: InuitKNowledgeAndClimateChange .

    3pm - 5pm: COP15's Indigenous voices on climate change film festival organized in Copenhagen by the United Nations University http://ourworld.unu.edu/en/cop15-filmfestival/

    PDF of the festival: http://ourworld.unu.edu/en/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/COP15-Indigenous-film-festival.pdf

    IsumaTV is proud to be associated with this project and to present the following program:

    3pm to 4pm: Indigenous voices on climate change film festival organized in Copenhagen

    - Adaptation to climate change by Mphunga Villagers in Malawi

    - Coping with rougher seas - Bangladesh

    - Drought: the death of Life - Iran

    - Climate change refugees - Carteret Islands, Papua New Guinea

    - Energy of the Pamir Mountains - Tajikistan

    - Farmer to farmer learning in a changing climate - Ethiopia

    4pm to 5pm: Indigenous voices on climate change film festival organized in Copenhagen

    - Kuna Yala, Panama

    - Pamiri women and the melting glaciers of Tajikistan

    - Sea level rise in Kowanyama - Cape York, Australia

    - Ama divers: where the sea whistle echoes - Japan

    - Sorghum: a crop of our ancestors - Madagascar

    - The forbidden forest of the Dayak - Borneo, Indonesia

    - Walking on country with spirits: biodiversity loss in Australia's wet tropics

    5pm - 6pm: Siila Watt-Cloutier's Lecture delivered in May 2009 in Iqaluit as part of the 9th Lafontaine-Baldwin Symposium.

    Siila is a renowned Canadian Inuit activist and she launched the world's first
    international legal action on climate change. You can see the interviews on which the legal action was based at this address: http://www.isuma.tv/international-legal-action-climate-change

     

    6pm - 7pm: A compilation of shorts, documentary and fiction related to climate change from IsumaTV

    - Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change, a 15min extract of the upcoming feature length documentary

    - Town hall meeting held in Iqaluit in May 2009 for the Lafontaine-Baldwin Symposium: an intervention from Meeka Mike http://www.isuma.tv/arcticuniversity

    - Town hall meeting held in Iqaluit in May 2009 for the Lafontaine-Baldwin Symposium: an intervention from Bernadette Dean quoting elders http://www.isuma.tv/arcticuniversity

    - Old Peter: a short documentary taking us to the world of Old Peter, the last surviving Shaman of the Kazym River, Russia http://www.isuma.tv/whydemocracy/old-peter

    - Speaking out on climate change: a silent film made by Pangnirtung's Julie Alivaktuk brilliantly pokes fun at the very serious issue of climate change and how it affects Arctic ecosystems and Inuit people. This film was developed through the Inuusivut project (www.inuusivut.com )

    - Aputili: a short film by Roselynn Akulukjuk from Pangnirtung, Nunavut. A local elder talk to us about climate change: riveting stories about her life and the changes that she has seen. This film was developed through the Inuusivut project (www.inuusivut.com )

    - Tungijuq: a short drama starring Tanya Tagaq and Zacharias Kunuk. A thought-provoking meditation on the seal-hunt and what it means to the traditional way of life for Inuit.


    7pm - 8pm: COP15's Indigenous voices on climate change film festival organized in Copenhagen by the United Nations University http://ourworld.unu.edu/en/cop15-filmfestival/

    PDF of the festival: http://ourworld.unu.edu/en/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/COP15-Indigenous-film-festival.pdf

    IsumaTV is proud to be associated with this project and to present the following program:

    - Fighting carbon with fire - Arnhem land, Australia

    - Finding a place to feed: Kyrgyzstan shepherd family & pasture loss

    - Inuit knowledge and climate change - Nunavut, Canada

    - Ama divers: where the sea whistle echoes - Japan

    - Maasai and climate change

    - Our fight against the dunes - Madagascar

    - Rediscovering Altai's human-nature relationships - Russia

    8pm - 10pm: Live from Igloolik in the Canadian Arctic. Join Zacharias Kunuk and Dr Ian Mauro in an engaging conversation about Inuit knowledge and climate change with elder Augustin Taqqaugaq and invitees joining on Skype. Audience is invited to join Zach and Ian through Skype using their Skype ID: InuitKNowledgeAndClimateChange .

     

    04-12-2008

    6653 views

  • More Voices on Inuit Knowledge & Climate Change

    More Voices on Inuit Knowledge & Climate Change

    par: IsumaTV

    Additional Voices on Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change are being uploaded every day to the channel http://www.isuma.tv/ikcc/voices. Some in Inuktitut, others in English.

    More discussion about Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change, other related human rights issues, see also IKCC at www.isuma.tv/ikcc

    14-10-2010

    22498 views

  • Nunavut Language Summit 2010

    Nunavut Language Summit 2010

    par: Stéphane Rituit

    Nunavut Language Summit
    Our language brings us together
    Iqaluit February 9-12, 2010-01-06

    ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᐅᖃᐅᓯᕐᒧᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᕐᔪᐊᕐ ᓂᖅ
    ᐃᖃᓗᐃᑦ, ᕕᕈᐊᕆ 8-12, 2010

    Nunavunmi uqauhivut atauhiutjutivutlu
    Iqaluit, iitjirurvia 9-12, 2010

    Le sommet de la langue du Nunavut
    Notre langue, c'est ce qui nous rassemble
    Iqaluit, 9-12 février, 2010

    ᑲᑎᒪᔾᔪᑎᒃᓴᑦ  KATIMATJUTIT    PROGRAMME

     

    ᐅᖃᐅᓯᕐᒧᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᓂᐅᔪᒧᑦ ᐅᖃᐅᓯᕗᑦ ᐊᑕᐅᓯᐅᔾᔪᑎᕗᑦ!

    Nunavunmi Uqauhikkut Katimaryuarnirmut - Uqausivut Atausiujjutivut!

     

    Nunavut Language Summit – Our Language Brings Us Together!

    Sommet de la Langue du Nunavut – Notre Langue, c’est ce qui nous rassemble!

     

     

    ᐃᖃᓗᐃᑦ, ᓄᓇᕗᑦ            Iqaluit, Nunavut

     

    ᕕᕗᐊᕆ 8-12, 2010        Fipyuali 8-12, 2010

    February 8-12, 2010     Du 8 au 12 février 2010

     

    ᕗᕉᐱᓱ ᐃᓐ ᑲᑎᒪᕝᕕᐊᓂ
    Frobisher Inn Hiniktarviup Miitirviani
    Frobisher Inn Conference Center
    Centre des congrès Frobisher Inn

     

    06-01-2010

    12749 views

    Anglais

  • Pangnirtung Television

    Pangnirtung Television

    par: COOP Pangnirtung

    Local server Mediaplayers broadcast films from IsumaTV’s website to home viewers 24/7 by cable TV. Call or Facebook your Station Manager to comment or add any film or video you want to watch. COMING SOON. Contact info@isuma.tv.

    01-04-2011

    5586 views

  • Qaujimaviit

    Qaujimaviit

    par: Stéphane Rituit

    Short videos about Inuktitut

    Qaujimaviit? is a series of educational, yet entertaining, videos for people who are interested in Inuktitut and want to learn more about the subtleties of this language.

    04-02-2009

    9219 views

    Inuktitut

  • SOL

    SOL

    par: Stéphane Rituit

    SOL - a new documentary by Arnait Video Productions.

    - more information coming soon -

    18-02-2012

    1585 views

  • sol-1

    sol-1

    par: Stéphane Rituit

    SOL - a new documentary by Arnait Video Productions.

    - more information coming soon -

    14-01-2013

    1060 views

  • The 9th Annual LaFontaine-Baldwin Symposium

    The 9th Annual LaFontaine-Baldwin Symposium

    par: IsumaTV

    LIVE on IsumaTV May 29th 7:45pm - 10 pm EST

    THE 9th ANNUAL LAFONTAINE-BALDWIN SYMPOSIUM: Featuring SIILA WATT-CLOUTIER

    Click more info for more information about this live webcast.

    - Opening Ceremony

    - Word of Welcome from Her Excellency the Right Honourable Michaëlle Jean, Governor General of Canada

    - Presentation of the winners of a photo competition by Dr Zacharias Kunuk O.C.

    - Presentation of the LaFontaine-Baldwin Symposium by John Ralston Saul

    - Introduction of Siila Watt-Cloutier by the Honourable Ann Meekitjuk Hanson, Commissioner of Nunavut

    - SIILA WATT-CLOUTIER, Inuit climate activist and 2007 Nobel Peace Prize nominee, speaking LIVE from Iqaluit on Inuit Knowledge, Human Rights and Climate Change.

    - Q&A and Inuit entertainment.

     

    THE 9th ANNUAL LAFONTAINE-BALDWIN SYMPOSIUM

    is a presentation of

    the Institute for Canadian Citizenship and The Dominion Institut

    This webcast live on IsumaTV from Iqaluit, Nunavut is made possible with the support of

    SSI Micro

    27-05-2009

    10937 views

    Inuktitut

  • Tungijuq

    Tungijuq

    par: Stéphane Rituit

    What We Eat: Inuit jazz throat-singer Tanya Tagaq, and Cannes-winning filmmaker Zacharias Kunuk, talk back to Brigitte Bardot and anti-sealhunting lobby on the eternal reality of hunting.

    Selected for Sundance, Toronto International Film Festival, Best Short, imagineNATIVE Film Fest 2009.

    BOOK A SCREENING, rent or buy the film from Vtape +1.416.351.1317 email wandav@vtape.org.

    Download Tungijuq VOD

     

    07-07-2009

    28268 views

Recent Uploads

  • Ningiuq
    00:11

    Ningiuq

    par: Carol Kunnuk

    chaîne: Igloolikmiut Community Page

    In 2009, Rachel Uyarasuk, elder of the Inuit community of Igloolik (Nunavut), evokes the ancestors whose name she received at birth. She explains how this transmission ensured their return among the world of the living.

    A film by Christin Merlhiot

    France, 2014, 11 minutes, animation

    Inuktitut with English & French subtitles

    14-04-2014

    4622 views

    Canada

    Inuktitut

  • First Peoples Festival in Peril

    First Peoples Festival in Peril

    par: Cara Di Staulo

    chaîne: Isuma News

    Is it possible for First Nations to hold a festival worthy of the name in Québec’s metropolis?

    The Montreal Frist Peoples Festival asks the question a press release distriburted this morning as the Partenariat du Quartier des spectacles (the PQDS), a paramunicipal body that administers a major program in support of events in Montreal’s downtown core cultural district, decided to cut off all grants to the Festival for the year 2014.

    The PQDS claims that the First Peoples Festival lacks sufficiently innovative programming. This is a surprising attack on the Montreal event that has very successfully and continually transformed itself over the years. Since it moved its activities to the Quartier des spectacles, it has offered a brand-new formula that richly highlights First Peoples culture, art and diversity.

    First Peoples Festival is a First Nations’ multi-disciplinary festival, an event unique in its genre and presented yearly by the Terres en vues/Land Insights society for the last 24 years.

    Last year, the festival succeeded in balancing its budget without a deficit although the very day its program was launched, June 18 2013, the PQDS announced a drastic $50 000 cut to the Festival’s budget. This year the festival was been hit with a great blow that could prove to be fatal.

    The festival states that this new obstacle is a test of the commitment of city of Montreal and government stakeholders to make a place for First Nations culture in Quebec’s metropolis and to associate these with the many commemorations set for city’s 375th anniversary in 2017.

    Festival organizers are demanding that those granting funds to the PQDS, the City of Montreal first and then the government of Québec, must take action without delay to reinstate a funding for First Peoples Festival within a structure that can allow it to develop and thrive.

    Moreover, the festival is questioning the very way funding is delivered by the PQSD. Organizers believe that it is high time, as ethical choices, corruption and fair practices are in the spotlight in Montréal during the ongoing Charbonneau Commission, to review the governance of this paramunicipal body that oversees such important budgets.

     

    Source: Land Insights

     

    03-03-2014

    1164 views

    Canada

    Anglais

  • DID in the News!

    DID in the News!

    par: Cara Di Staulo

    chaîne: Isuma News

    On Their Terms: A Digital Project to Give Inuit Say in Developers' Arctic Ambitions

    BY Elisabeth Fraser

    A new project in Canada’s north is attempting to bridge the digital divide facing Inuit communities. In doing so, it hopes to give them a say as developers move to take advantage of their resource-rich land.

    Digital Indigenous Democracy (DID) is an effort to bring the community empowerment of new media technology into remote low-bandwidth indigenous communities in Nunavut, across Canada, and around the world,” says Norman Cohn, an award-winning Canadian filmmaker who is also the project co-director, with partner Zacharias Kunuk, an Inuk filmmaker.

    The idea is to provide high-speed Internet access to Inuit living in northern communities, where extremely low bandwidth access makes surfing the net a slow and cumbersome task. “These people, who most need access to these networks, have the worst cost-per-bandwidth in the civilized world,” says Cohn.

    Life in the Northern communities where Canada’s Inuit live can be challenging. Traditionally, the Inuit are a hunting society. However, nowadays both global warming and opposition from animal-rights groups are negatively affecting the hunt. There are high levels of poverty, substance abuse, and suicide. There is a housing shortage, and high levels of family violence, as well as chronic health problems like diabetes. The remote and vastly scattered locations of these villages carry distinct challenges as well, including sky-high prices on basic goods. Most places are hard to access from the south, accessible via boat during the summer, or by expensive flights year-round. And, despite federal investment to improve bandwidth access in these communities, the Internet remains very slow.

    Just how slow is it? “Most people can remember how the Internet was when they first tried it out five or ten years ago, and how much faster it is now,” explains Cohn. “Use of the Internet we take for granted right now is only possible because our bandwidth has increased by hundreds of thousands of times, and at a low cost. Those speed increases have not impacted northern Inuit communities. Their Internet is among the slowest and most expensive … There is a digital divide, certainly in the Canadian North, as much as in Bangladesh.”

    Canada’s Inuit are one of three Canadian Aboriginal groups (the others are the Métis and First Nations). They are somewhat unique amongst Indigenous peoples in North America, because they have negotiated a self-governing agreement with the federal government of Canada. Whereas Canadian and U.S. First-Nations people often live on government reserves and receive government assistance or a special tax status, Inuit are by and large self-sufficient.

    Cohn says the project is essential to help Inuit protect their rights in a new age of resource extraction. “The origins of this project are in the evolution of two enormous world developments. The one is the evolution of new media technology and its potential for social networking and political change, which we’ve seen in the Middle East,” Cohn says, referencing the Arab Spring. “And this intersects with the evolution of global warming, which has created an increase in natural resource development in the Canadian Arctic.”

    Digital Indigenous Democracy has been financed and tested around a specific giant mining development (the “Mary River Project”) by the Baffinland company.

    “If (the development) goes forward in its full capacity, it would be the largest mine ever in Canada,” says Cohn. DID was created in the context of Baffinland’s ongoing environmental review process, which involves consultation with local stakeholders. These talks have produced an Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement, as required by law under the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement.

    “Our project was proposed and financed to test out this technology as a way of improving Inuit communities’ ability to participate in the decision-making process of such an enormous development that will impact these communities forever,” Cohn says. “So, we had a compelling technological concept for equal justice, but we also had a compelling urgent need for that project to take place as soon as possible.”

    Started in April 2011 via Canada Media Fund financing, Digital Indigenous Democracy went live one year later, in April 2012. It runs on the ISUMA TV platform, created by Cohn and co. in 2008. The multimedia website features photographs and government information documents, as well as audio and video recordings, in English and in Indigenous languages like Inuktitut.

    In addition to putting forward local content, in the form of radio programming, films and documentaries, and community news,DID has played an active part in the local consultations involving the Baffinland project. A series of radio call-in shows allowed locals to ask experts questions about the development, and Baffinland feedback collected via DID has been complied into a report, which will be presented in the next round of public hearings, tentatively scheduled to take place in mid-October.

    Lloyd Lipsett is a human rights lawyer who has been participating in the public consultation process surrounding the Baffinland project. He took part in radio call-in shows the DID group organized in Igloolik, Nunavut, to answer questions and inform locals about the Baffinland project, in English and Inuktitut.

    “If you want the people to be confident that the mine is benefitting them, they need to have the information to make that judgment. It’s important to recognize that the movement towards transparency in the (extractive industry) is really picking up steam,” says Lipsett, who notes the Canadian government has announced it will pass binding regulations ensuring mining companies have greater disclosure towards various levels of government, something the United States and European Union have already done.

    Canadian constitutional law and international law now explicitly confirms Indigenous people have the right to be informed and consulted about any resource development that impacts their lands and their communities. According to Lispett, the new approach towards consultation offered by DID is a benefit to locals and developers alike.

    Most human-rights interventions involving extraction projects happen after development has started, when things are perceived to be going badly. “Getting involved in public hearings before the project has taken place; you are taking a proactive approach,” says Lispett. “You’re dealing with all the different stakeholders, including the company itself. To talk to them in a proactive, forward-looking manner, is much more constructive then pointing your finger after, and saying, “You’re doing this wrong, you’re violating this right, or that right…We’re offering you suggestions as to how you can develop this mine in a way that is respectful to people.”

    The economic stakes are significant, too."The wealth in the arctic is enormous,” says Cohn. “It’s sort of like the new Congo, but suddenly much more accessible than it ever was before. “The world has changed since King Leopold went into the Congo, but only if technology helps people take advantage of those changes. (DID) is the only way Indigenous people will get a real fair seat at the negotiating table, dividing up what everyone agrees are trillions of dollars.”

    Frances Abele is a Professor of Public Policy and Public Administration at Carleton University. She is familiar with the project. She touts the community-building aspect of DID. “If you haven’t been to the North, it’s very hard to picture just how far apart everything is,” she says. “To allow people to speak to each other in real time is a really powerful change in order to have people talk about their common interests, and politics.”

    “The local radio has been very, very, important for a long time, it’s the main way that people find out what’s going on, and they listen to that every day,” says Abele. “The genius of what Norman and Zacharias are doing is that they’ve been able to build on that network to create these communities.”

    Mark Airut is the manager of the Igloolik radio station, now run by ISUMA since last May. He is Inuk, and echoes Abele’s praise for DID. “I think it’s really great, lots and lots of people are now following us, and now they listen to our radio all over the world,” he says. He says since ISUMA took over, the station’s workers have gone from being voluntary to paid staff, and many locals say ISUMA radio is now all they listen to. “We’re doing our best work on educational stuff,” says Airut. “It’s really successful.”

    Currently, Cohn estimates the project is two-thirds completed. “Our website will play at high speed in what will eventually be ten indigenous communities,” he says. ISUMA has been hooking people up since the spring, and will continue to do so during the fall.

    Underlying the entire project is the principal of open data and transparency as a tool to combat inequality. “Indigenous people see these developments as the only chance they have to get out of poverty and into the 21st century,” says Cohn. “If all the people involved are sharing in the exploitation of the resources, then it’s not pejorative. If the people involved are being exploited, then its pejorative … Today, you cannot get away with that level of inequality unless it’s hidden from public view.”

    Cohn believes DID can be a powerful tool to give Indigenous people their fair share of the pie. “If people have those tools, you cannot deny them those rights,” he says. “These communities are sitting on mountains of minerals, of gold, of uranium.” He sees a future for this project in Indigenous communities throughout the world, and notes it is in developer’s interest to properly inform and consult, or risk huge lawsuits down the road.

    How much the Inuit will eventually profit from the Baffinland development remains to be seen, but Cohn is hopeful. “Indigenous people are not genetically impoverished,” he says. “If everyone owned the land they were living on, Inuit people could quite very well be rich,” he argues. “Why are Inuit peoples more like Palestinians than Saudi Arabians? In 2013, you can’t do that to people, unless you’re doing it in the dark.”

    Elisabeth Fraser is a freelance Canadian journalist. She lives in Montreal.

    Personal Democracy Media is grateful to the Omidyar Network and the UN Foundation for their generous support of techPresident's WeGov section.

    www.techpresident.com

     

    30-09-2013

    1152 views

  • Ask Zach & Ian questions via Twitter leading up to our screening in New York on March 31.

    Ask Zach & Ian questions via Twitter leading up to our screening in New York on March 31.

    par: Teague Schneiter

    chaîne: Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

    IsumaTV announces our next interactive screening of our newest film Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change , taking place in New York City and online at www.isuma.tv/ikcc. We invite you to think of questions you would like to ask filmmakers Zacharias Kunuk and Ian Mauro at the event. You can send us these questions via Twitter using the hashtag #ikcc_nafvf . A hashtag is just a way of organizing tweets so that both Isuma and the Native American Film + Video Festival can work together. All you have to do is type your question in twitter and at the end of the tweet type: "#ikcc_nafvf". We look forward to hearing from you!

    If you're on facebook, you can rsvp for the event here

    14-03-2011

    3258 views

Chaînes

  • ARNAIT NIPINGIT : WOMEN'S LEADERSHIP SUMMIT

    ARNAIT NIPINGIT : WOMEN'S LEADERSHIP SUMMIT

    par: Marie-Hélène Co...

    Collecting, Connecting and Creating Women’s Voices in Nunavut

    September 13-17, 2010 Iqaluit, Nunavut

    Welcome to the blog we created during the Symposium! We want to keep you  updated on what happened in Iqaluit during this exciting meeting. You will find here photos, videos and texts, in Inuktitut and English from the Symposium participants.

    Now is the time for you to comment, post your opinions and participate in keeping the dialogue going. Together we can make this and on-going discussion and keep the energy flowing.

    Arnait Media Productions is sponsoring this blog thanks to the support of the Canada Council for the Arts.

    03-09-2010

    15307 views

    Inuktitut

  • Distribution

    Distribution

    par: John Hodgins

    These urls are direct links to 1080p h264 files for Isuma Productions. They can be copied (right-click and select "Copy Link Location") and pasted and emailed directly to authorized clients. These urls are specially encoded and stop working after 24 hours from the time you loaded this page. To generate new urls, simply refresh this page.

    This page is a private page and is visible only to it's members. Only people who are acting as distributors for Isuma Productions should have access to this page. Clients who are licensing these videos should be sent the appropriate download urls. They should not be given access to this page.

    getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'atn.hd.1080p.1.mp4', 86400); print l('Atanarjuat 1080p (english subtitles) part 1', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'atn.hd.1080p.2.mp4', 86400); print l('Atanarjuat 1080p (english subtitles) part 2', $link) . '

    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'jkr.hd.1080p.1.mp4', 86400); print l('JKR 1080p (english subtitles) part 1', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'jkr.hd.1080p.2.mp4', 86400); print l('JKR 1080p (english subtitles) part 2', $link) . '

    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'bt.hd.1080p.1.mp4', 86400); print l('BT 1080p (english subtitles) part 1', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'bt.hd.1080p.2.mp4', 86400); print l('BT 1080p (english subtitles) part 2', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'bt_es_1080.mp4', 86400); print l('BT 1080p (spanish subtitles)', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'bt_es_1080.mp4', 86400); print l('BT 1080p (french subtitles)', $link) . '

    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'tungijuq.1080p.mp4', 86400); print l('Tungijuq h264 (431MB)', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'tungijuq.1080p.mpg', 86400); print l('Tungijuq MPEG (1.2GB)', $link) . '

    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'ikcc.1080.mp4', 86400); print l('Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change (english subtitles) (2.6 GB)', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'ikcc_fr_1080.mp4', 86400); print l('Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change (french subtitles) (2.6 GB)', $link); ?>

    27-01-2010

    3099 views

  • International Legal Action on Climate Change

    International Legal Action on Climate Change

    par: IsumaTV

    On December 7, 2005, Silla Watt-Cloutier and sixty-two Inuit hunters and elders from communities across Canada and Alaska filed a petition with the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. Based on the findings of the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment*, the petition alleges that the unchecked emissions of greenhouse gases from the United States violate Inuit cultural and environmental human rights as guaranteed by the 1948 American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man. 

    Although the IACHR decided against hearing her petition, the Commission invited Ms. Watt-Cloutier to testify with her international legal team (including lawyers from Earthjustice and the Center for International Environmental Law) at their first hearing on climate change and human rights on March 1, 2007.

    This channel features the unedited interviews from the petition.

    *The Arctic Climate Impact Assessment projects that Inuit hunting culture may not survive the loss of sea ice and other changes projected over the coming decades.

    05-06-2009

    14038 views

    Anglais

  • The Fast Runner Trilogy

    The Fast Runner Trilogy

    par: John Hodgins

    Three unique Inuit films expressing the dramatic history of one of the world’s oldest oral cultures from it’s own point of view.
    “A masterpiece... The first national cinema of the 21st century.” – A.O. Scott, NY Times review of Atanarjuat The Fast Runner, 2002.

    Atanarjuat The Fast Runner

    2001 Camera d'Or, Cannes

    Atanajuat

     

    View

    More about film | Companion website

    Download in SD

    Download in 720p HD

    Download in 1080p HD

    The Journals of Knud Rasmussen

    2006 Opening Night Film, Toronto

    Journals of Knud Rasmussen

     

    View

    More about film | Companion website

    Download in SD

    Download in 720p HD

    Download in 1080p HD

    Before Tomorrow

    2009 World Cinema Competition, Sundance

    Before Tomorrow

     

    View

    More about film | Companion website

    Download in SD

    Download in 720p HD

    Download in 1080p HD

    23-10-2009

    239850 views

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