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Inuusivut

Art et galeries

First Peoples Festival in Peril

Is it possible for First Nations to hold a festival worthy of the name in Québec’s metropolis?

The Montreal Frist Peoples Festival asks the question a press release distriburted this morning as the Partenariat du Quartier des spectacles (the PQDS), a paramunicipal body that administers a major program in support of events in Montreal’s downtown core cultural district, decided to cut off all grants to the Festival for the year 2014.

The PQDS claims that the First Peoples Festival lacks sufficiently innovative programming. This is a surprising attack on the Montreal event that has very successfully and continually transformed itself over the years. Since it moved its activities to the Quartier des spectacles, it has offered a brand-new formula that richly highlights First Peoples culture, art and diversity.

First Peoples Festival is a First Nations’ multi-disciplinary festival, an event unique in its genre and presented yearly by the Terres en vues/Land Insights society for the last 24 years.

Last year, the festival succeeded in balancing its budget without a deficit although the very day its program was launched, June 18 2013, the PQDS announced a drastic $50 000 cut to the Festival’s budget. This year the festival was been hit with a great blow that could prove to be fatal.

The festival states that this new obstacle is a test of the commitment of city of Montreal and government stakeholders to make a place for First Nations culture in Quebec’s metropolis and to associate these with the many commemorations set for city’s 375th anniversary in 2017.

Festival organizers are demanding that those granting funds to the PQDS, the City of Montreal first and then the government of Québec, must take action without delay to reinstate a funding for First Peoples Festival within a structure that can allow it to develop and thrive.

Moreover, the festival is questioning the very way funding is delivered by the PQSD. Organizers believe that it is high time, as ethical choices, corruption and fair practices are in the spotlight in Montréal during the ongoing Charbonneau Commission, to review the governance of this paramunicipal body that oversees such important budgets.

 

Source: Land Insights

 

Kingulliit: The Next Generation (Part 1)

Kingulliit: The Next Generation (Part 1)

Unikkaat Sivunittinnit: Messages from the Past

In 1992, Igloolik Isuma Productions produced a documentary film about traditional Inuit ajaja songs.

Produced by Norman Cohn and Zacharias Kunuk when they were just starting their independent film company, Kunuk searched to better understand ajaja songs: where did the songs come from, how where they made and how have they been passed down generation to generation.

Each elder remembers their own family’s ajaja songs and explains how they were created by poets taking their words from their life experiences. The process also allowed Kunuk to collect traditional music  to publish a full album on CD and to use many of these tradition ajaja songs in his films over the next twenty years.

Year: 2012
Language: Inuktitut
Length: 60 minutes
   
Directors: Zacharias Kunuk
Camera: Norman Cohn
Editor: Carol Kunnuk

 

Listen free to a selection of these songs here

Order the full CD of Unikaat Sivunittinnit (Messages from the Past) contact VTape

 

Portrait de Qajaaq Ellsworth

Inuusivut

The Inuusivut Project is a national initiative of the Embrace Life Council and the National Inuit Youth Council. The primary objective of the project is to learn, document and share - through a variety of multi-media techniques - how Inuit perceive, express, develop, foster and promote mental health.

madeskimo AV

a collection of original electronic music production, and public video archives and visual effects, madeskimo's AV draws a thread in a continuum of ideas about the frontier and the meeting place of cultures.

an audiovisual work by madeskimo aka Geronimo Inutiq
& featuring the voices of Sylvia Cloutier, Taqralik Partridge, Adina Duffy, and Nina Segalowitz.

York University Photos

York University Photos

Warm Up The Ice Cream

An One Act Play By D. Morin

Northern Scene Festival 2013

Artcirq show at the Northern Scene Festival in Ottawa performed on April 30, 2013 in front of a full house including the Honourable Eva Aariak, Premier of Nunavut and her guests.

Integral performance from beginning to intermission only.

 

Our Baffinland Atlas

ABOUT OUR BAFFINLAND

The Arctic is warming double the global average, decreasing sea ice, making it easier to access and extract mineral and oil resources from the region, and this cumulative climatic and economic change has significant human and environmental health implications for Inuit and their communities. In Nunavut, the proposed Baffinland Iron Mine, at the site of Mary River, is one of the largest industrial developments ever conceived for the Arctic, and will involve year-round shipping of ore across sensitive permafrost, marine ecosystems and regions of cultural significance that have and continue to be used by Inuit. The Our Baffinland project explores Inuit knowledge regarding mining, and shows a walrus and caribou hunting expedition and associated interviews with elders across this landscape. This digital media presentation highlights the complexities of "Arctic Development".

CREATIVE TEAM

A production of: Kingulliit Productions Inc.

Executive Producers: Norman Cohn and Zacharias Kunuk

Producers: Zacharias Kunuk, Stéphane Rituit, and Ian Mauro.

Project Managers: Gabriela Gámez, Gillian Robinson and Ian Mauro

Creative Directors: Zacharias Kunuk and Ian Mauro

Technology Director and Programmer: John Hodgins

Designer and Animator: Marc Labelle

Video and Photography: David Poisey, Jon Frantz, Zacharias Kunuk and Ian Mauro

Sound: Tobias Haynes

Editors: Ian Mauro, Jon Frantz, Craig Norris and Carol Kunnuk

Translators: Carol Kunnuk and Sarah Arnatsiaq

Research: Ian Mauro

PARTNERS AND SUPPORT

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