First Nations

About

maia iotzova's picture

23 March 2016

1637 views

This 72 min documentary captures the heart felt struggle of a community to protect the Red Hill Valley (one of Canada’s largest urban parks) from a four-lane expressway. The story follows the unique cooperation of First Nations and various Hamilton citizens in setting up a camp in the Red Hill Valley and holding off construction crews.

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Duration:

5m 53s

Tagged:

community struggle, environmental destruction, First Nations, haudenosaunee, Human Rights, Six Nations, Southern Ontario

About

IBC admin's picture

26 February 2016

1042 views

Program name: Takujuminaqtut / Takuyuminaqtut
Producer: Rankin Inlet - Inuit Broadcasting Corporation
Host: Leo Subgut
Segment 1: A First Nations drummer and band from Alberta came to Rankin Inlet to talk about addictions.
Segment 2: Joe Inukshuk and Paul Pissuk talk about their experience while being lost during a hunting trip.

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Duration:

28m 56s

Tagged:

addictions, Arctic, Canadian Inuit, drum dancing, First Nations, hunting, IBC, inuit broadcasting corporation, Nunavut, throat singing

Languages:

Inuktitut

Location:

Rankin Inlet Nunavut

About

ARVIATTV's picture

21 October 2015

2260 views

Ottawa, October 21, 2015 - Today, thousands of students across Canada joined 400,000 of their peers, in over 60 countries, in celebration of the international day to empower youth with dignity, Global Dignity Day.

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Duration:

1m 46s

Tagged:

ashley callingbull, children, dignity, First Nations, global dignity, Human Rights, Inuit, youth

Languages:

English

Location:

Ontario Canada, Ottawa

About

IBC admin's picture

31 May 2015

1887 views

Producer: Iqaluit – Inuit Broadcasting Corporation
Host: Rebecca Anaviapik-Soucie

Segment 1: Aimo Nukiruaq (Nookiguak) went to Greenland to interview a singer.

Segment 2: William Tagoona sings with a Greenlandic singer on stage.

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Duration:

28m 50s

Tagged:

Arctic, Canadian Inuit, concert, dene, First Nations, Greenland, hockey, IBC, inuit broadcasting corporation, Nunavut, NWT boundary, singing, toonik tyme

Languages:

Inuktitut

Location:

Iqaluit

About

IBC admin's picture

24 May 2015

1074 views

Program name: Qaujisaut

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Duration:

28m 53s

Tagged:

Arctic, Canadian Inuit, carrying case, drum, First Nations, fish spear, fishing, IBC, inuit broadcasting corporation, Kakivak, Nunavut, songs, strap

Languages:

Inuktitut

Location:

Iqaluit

About

ARVIATTV's picture

30 December 2014

2231 views

This informative panel presentation share stories of practical experience from those engaged in community engagement activities that support community resilience.

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Duration:

1h 10m 31s

Tagged:

aboriginal, community, First Nations, isolation, learning, poverty, resilience, social connectedness, Toronto

Location:

Toronto, ON, Canada

About

ARVIATTV's picture

30 December 2014

1719 views

In this session moderated by Matthew Bishop of The Economist, Florence and Kluane Adamek (Jane Glassco Northern Fellowship, Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation) share what sums up their feelings of greatest isolation, and when in their lives have they felt most isolated.

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Duration:

33m 8s

Tagged:

economist, First Nations, indigenous, isolation, poverty, social connectedness, Toronto, yukon

About

ARVIATTV's picture

20 May 2014

4694 views

GLOBAL DIGNITY DAY

On October 15, 2014, role models from across the country and around the world – including parents, educators, athletes, Senators, former and current Members of Parliament as well as international business and thought leaders – join thousands of volunteers to make the day possible.

Global Dignity (http://globaldignity.org) is an independent, non-political organization focused on empowering individuals with the concept that every human being has the universal right to lead a dignified life.

In Canada, role models speak with youth across the country from Nunavut to British Columbia with the aim to instill a positive, inclusive and interconnected sense of value in young people that will guide them as they grow.

GLOBAL DIGNITY

Established in 2005, by HRH Crown Prince Haakon of Norway, Operation HOPE Founder, Chairman and CEO John Hope Bryant and Professor Pekka Himanen, GD is linked to the 2020 process of the World Economic Forum, in which leaders from politics, business, academia, and civil society join efforts to improve the state of the world. GD is an independent, non-political organization focused on empowering individuals with the concept that every human being has the universal right to lead a dignified life.

For more information on Global Dignity Day in Canada visit www.globaldignity.ca

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Tagged:

Arctic, canada, dignity, First Nations, Human Rights, indigenous, Inuit, Métis, north, northern, norway, respect, students, united states, volunteer, youth

About

ARVIATTV's picture

30 April 2014

3439 views

Canadian singer-songwriter and internationally recognized humanitarian Bruce Cockburn, is lending his voice to suicide prevention by partnering with the Collateral Damage Project. The Order of Canada recipient is releasing a video calling for a dialogue on suicide. To view the video, go to www.leftbehindbysuicide.org

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Duration:

2m 6s

Tagged:

aboriginal, arts, canada, collateral damage, education, First Nations, Inuit, Métis, music, suicide, youth

Languages:

English

Harper cabinet readies major B.C. pipelines push

B.C. First Nations leaders to meet with key federal officials Sept. 23 in Vancouver

By CHRIS HALLl

A parade of cabinet ministers and senior bureaucrats will head to British Columbia starting next week as part of a major push to mollify opponents of building oil pipelines to the West Coast, CBC News has learned.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper is signalling he intends to make progress on proposals to connect Alberta's oilsands with ports in British Columbia and the lucrative Asian markets beyond.

The new initiative is in large part a response to a report from the prime minister's special pipelines representative in British Columbia. Douglas Eyford told Harper last month that negotiations with First Nations — especially on Enbridge's proposed Northern Gateway — are a mess.

Eyford's report to the prime minister, and his final report in November, will not be made public.

But sources tell CBC News Eyford urged the federal government take the lead role in dealing with Indian bands on both the Gateway project and the proposed expansion of Kinder Morgan's Trans-Mountain pipeline.

First Nations leaders in B.C. confirm they are to meet on Sept. 23 in Vancouver with a delegation of deputy ministers from Aboriginal Affairs, Natural Resources, Environment and other departments with direct oversight of the proposed projects.

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, of the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs, said the request to meet came out of the blue on Thursday, with no agenda — and no indication of what Ottawa is prepared to offer.

"I have a sinking feeling that perhaps they're covering their backsides in terms of a consultation record,'' Phillip said in an interview from Vancouver. "And looking towards laying the groundwork that will be necessary when the decision is finally made by Prime Minister Harper and the cabinet, regardless of what the joint review panel comes forward with in terms of an approval or a rejection of these proposed projects.''

Federal bureaucrats aren't the only ones with orders to head to B.C.

Starting Monday, Harper has directed key ministers on the file to promote the projects in the province.

Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver will continue to be the lead minister. Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt will be in B.C. all next week, although the primary reason for his trip is to attend hearings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Others planning trips before Thanksgiving are Transport Minister Lisa Raitt and Environment Minister Leona Aglukkaq.

Phillip said they have all asked for meetings with First Nations.

Adding to the sudden flurry of interest from politicians, Phillip said B.C. Premier Christy Clark wrote to request a sit-down with them too, proposing a time that actually overlaps with the federal meeting.

"I find it very disturbing … that there's such an urgency attached to both letters," Phillip said, noting the chiefs had heard nothing from the politicians for months, until now.

Energy superpower — or pipe dream?

Federal sources say the objective is to work proactively to convince First Nations, community groups, and B.C.'s government that moving oil through the province is good for the economy, and good for them.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper is making a push to convince B.C. Premier Christy Clark, background, and B.C. First Nations to drop their opposition to proposed pipelines carrying Alberta oil and gas through the province for export. (Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press)

It's the second prong in a fall campaign to realize Harper's vision of Canada as an energy superpower, a vision that so far remains just a pipe dream, when so much of the country's vast oil deposits remain in landlocked Alberta.

CBC News reported last week that Harper wrote U.S. President Barack Obama in late August to propose joint standards for reduced greenhouse gas emissions for the oil and gas sector in both countries, in return for presidential approval of the proposed $7-billion Keystone XL pipeline from Alberta to refineries on the U.S. Gulf Coast.

And now comes the new overtures in British Columbia, complete with a more conciliatory tone from the federal Conservatives, who until now have opted largely for confrontation over co-operation with pipeline opponents.

Sources tell CBC News that the Prime Minister's Office met recently with First Nations representatives, asking what Ottawa could do to address their concerns.

The meeting on Sept. 23 is a followup. Representatives from the B.C. Assembly of First Nations and Coastal First Nations are also invited.

First Nations focus

Federal officials say they aren't there to make specific offers, but to engage groups directly affected by both the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline to Kitimat, B.C., and Kinder Morgan's Trans-Mountain pipeline to Burnaby, B.C.

Ottawa is also increasing its efforts to appease the B.C. premier. Clark set out five conditions to approve the controversial Northern Gateway project, including improved methods to prevent and clean up spills and a bigger share of revenues for the province.

Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver is one of the Harper ministers who will be spending more time in B.C. over the next few weeks. (Darryl Dyck/Canadian Press)

Ottawa already responded to some of these demands, for example, announcing new regulations last spring to improve the safety of oil tankers and oil-handling terminals, raising the corporate liability for offshore spills to $1 billion and imposing a new set of fines of up to $100,000 for safety breaches that, if unaddressed, could lead to more serious problems.

But dealing with the concerns of First Nations bands remains the biggest challenge.

Federal officials acknowledge that Enbridge did a poor job in dealing with bands along the proposed Gateway route. Media reports suggest the company now faces a nearly impossible task to earn local support.

The outlook is better, if not exactly rosy, for U.S. based Kinder Morgan’s plans to twin its Trans-Mountain pipeline that runs from Edmonton through Kamloops to Burnaby.

At least three First Nations oppose the plan, which would triple the amount of crude oil being transported each day to 890,000 barrels. Area Indian bands say the line is old and prone to leaks.

One of the communities, the Coldwater Indian Band near Merritt, will be in a B.C. court Oct. 30 looking for a judicial order that would prevent Ottawa from approving the expansion without its consent.

The company plans to file its formal application with the National Energy Board later this year.

In an email, Coldwater Chief Harold Aljam said his band has met with Eyford, but no one from the federal government has contacted the band for a further meeting.

Coldwater, he said, is still preparing to go to court.

Big stakes

For First Nations, the fear is the Harper government intends to push through both pipeline proposals no matter what.

Much of the discussion will be about the economic benefits of the projects and the role the pipelines will play in diversifying Canada’s energy exports.

Ottawa is feeling the pressure from the oil and gas industry, as well as other business groups.

In a report to be released next week, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce says being captive to the U.S. market now costs Canadian oil producers $50 million a day. Of that, $10 million is lost tax revenues to various levels of government.

The message: someone has to show the political courage to push through pipelines.

And that person, no doubt, will be Stephen Harper. The man with the pipe dreams.

www.cbc.ca

About

Cara Di Staulo's picture

15 October 2013

1220 views

Tagged:

Alberta, BC, First Nations, harper, oilsands, Pipeline