Teague Schneiter

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I am a moving image archivist who focuses on preservation, archiving, and access to indigenous media.See more

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  • Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

    uploaded by: Ian Mauro

     

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    BOOK A SCREENING, rent or buy the film from Vtape +1.416.351.1317 email wandav@vtape.org.

    About the film

    Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change had its world premiere October 23, 2010, at the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival in Toronto. The complete film also streamed online simultaneously watched by more than 1500 viewers around the world. Following the film, a Q&A with filmmakers Zacharias Kunuk and Dr. Ian Mauro included live call-in by Skype from viewers from Pond Inlet, New York, Sydney, Australia and other locations.

    Nunavut-based director Zacharias Kunuk (Atanarjuat The Fast Runner) and researcher and filmmaker Dr. Ian Mauro (Seeds of Change) have teamed up with Inuit communities to document their knowledge and experience regarding climate change. This new documentary, the world’s first Inuktitut language film on the topic, takes the viewer “on the land” with elders and hunters to explore the social and ecological impacts of a warming Arctic. This unforgettable film helps us to appreciate Inuit culture and expertise regarding environmental change and indigenous ways of adapting to it.

    READ MORE
    Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change had its world premiere October 23, 2010, at the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival in Toronto. The complete film also streamed online simultaneously watched by more than 1500 viewers around the world. Following the film, a Q&A with filmmakers Zacharias Kunuk and Dr. Ian Mauro included live call-in by Skype from viewers from Pond Inlet, New York, Sydney, Australia and other locations.

     

    Nunavut-based director Zacharias Kunuk (Atanarjuat The Fast Runner) and researcher and filmmaker Dr. Ian Mauro (Seeds of Change) have teamed up with Inuit communities to document their knowledge and experience regarding climate change. This new documentary, the world’s first Inuktitut language film on the topic, takes the viewer “on the land” with elders and hunters to explore the social and ecological impacts of a warming Arctic. This unforgettable film helps us to appreciate Inuit culture and expertise regarding environmental change and indigenous ways of adapting to it.

    Exploring centuries of Inuit knowledge, allowing the viewer to learn about climate change first-hand from Arctic residents themselves, the film portrays Inuit as experts regarding their land and wildlife and makes it clear that climate change is a human rights issue affecting this ingenious Indigenous culture. Hear stories about Arctic melting and how Inuit believe that human and animal intelligence are key to adaptability and survival in a warming world.

    Community-based screenings of the film are now being organized across Canada. Stay tuned for more information, new blog posts and videos added to this channel regularly.

    Please feel free to contact us should you like to organize a screening in your area. Email us: isuma@isuma.ca.

    LESS INFO
     
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    uploaded date: 29-04-2009

  • The DIAMA Blog

    uploaded by: Teague Schneiter

    The DIAMA Blog is an ongoing conversation related to the topic of indigenous media archiving. It will include posts related to the preservation and access of indigenous media via web technologies, as well as ways that archives and archival content is being used commuities, such as language preservation.… Read more

    uploaded date: 13-06-2010

  • First Peoples Festival in Peril

    uploaded by: Cara Di Staulo

    channel: Isuma News

    Is it possible for First Nations to hold a festival worthy of the name in Québec’s metropolis?

    The Montreal Frist Peoples Festival asks the question a press release distriburted this morning as the Partenariat du Quartier des spectacles (the PQDS), a paramunicipal body that administers a major program in support of events in Montreal’s downtown core cultural district, decided to cut off all grants to the Festival for the year 2014.

    The PQDS claims that the First Peoples Festival lacks sufficiently innovative programming. This is a surprising attack on the Montreal event that has very successfully and continually transformed itself over the years. Since it moved its activities to the Quartier des spectacles, it has offered a brand-new formula that richly highlights First Peoples culture, art and diversity.

    First Peoples Festival is a First Nations’ multi-disciplinary festival, an event unique in its genre and presented yearly by the Terres en vues/Land Insights society for the last 24 years.

    Last year, the festival succeeded in balancing its budget without a deficit although the very day its program was launched, June 18 2013, the PQDS announced a drastic $50 000 cut to the Festival’s budget. This year the festival was been hit with a great blow that could prove to be fatal.

    The festival states that this new obstacle is a test of the commitment of city of Montreal and government stakeholders to make a place for First Nations culture in Quebec’s metropolis and to associate these with the many commemorations set for city’s 375th anniversary in 2017.

    Festival organizers are demanding that those granting funds to the PQDS, the City of Montreal first and then the government of Québec, must take action without delay to reinstate a funding for First Peoples Festival within a structure that can allow it to develop and thrive.

    Moreover, the festival is questioning the very way funding is delivered by the PQSD. Organizers believe that it is high time, as ethical choices, corruption and fair practices are in the spotlight in Montréal during the ongoing Charbonneau Commission, to review the governance of this paramunicipal body that oversees such important budgets.

     

    Source: Land Insights

     

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    uploaded date: 03-03-2014

  • Tupiliarniq

    uploaded by: John Hodgins

    channel: Kingulliit

    This film shows the building of a seal-skin tent, and how the skin was primed for such construction.

    TUPILIURNIQ (1973)

    Fabrication of a ringed seal skin tent with the family of Iqallijuq, Michel Kupaaq and Jeannie Arnainnuk

    16 mm colour movie, silent

    Excerpt presented : 1 minute 30

    Director : B. Saladin d’Anglure

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    uploaded date: 26-09-2015

  • Qarmaq

    uploaded by: John Hodgins

    channel: Kingulliit

    The film shows the construction of the basis of a Qarmaq, a semi-subterranean winter home with walls made of peat sods, which were cut after the first frost. The top of the block is well frozen, whereas the bottom is still wet, so the block will stick to the floor or the block it is put on.

    QARMALIURNIQ (1974)

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    uploaded date: 26-09-2015

  • Quaqtaq

    uploaded by: John Hodgins

    channel: Kingulliit

    Filmed in 1956, this document presents the Inuit life in the winter camp of Quaqtaq, comprised of large family igloos. Traditional, their life is punctuated by hunting, women gathering, social life, building igloos, children playing...… Read more

    uploaded date: 22-09-2015

  • Kingulliit

    uploaded by: Stéphane Rituit

    ᑭᖑᓪᓖᑦ ᐅᖄᕗᖅ ᐃᓄᓐᓂᒃ ᐃᓅᓕᓚᐅᕐᓯᒪᔪᓂᒃ 1900-ᐄᑦ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᕐᖄᕕᓂᖏᓐᓂ 30-ᓂ. ᐊᑦᓯᔭᐅᒪᔪᕕᓃᑦ `ᑭᖑᕚᖑᓕᕐᑐᑦ` ᓯᕗᓪᓕᐹᐅᓐᓂᕋᒥᒃ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒐᓴᕐᔪᐊᓂ ᓵᑦᓯᓱᑎᒃ ᐊᑦᔨᐅᖏᑦᑐᒥᒃ ᓄᓇᕐᔪᐊᖑᒻᒥᔪᒥᒃ ᐊᓯᑦᔨᓚᐅᕐᓯᒪᓐᖏᑑᑉ ᖃᐅᔨᒻᒫᕆᔭᐅᑦᓱᓂᓗ ᓴᓂᐊᓐᓂᑦ ᑲᒪᒋᔭᐅᓕᓂᒻᒪᕆᐅᑦᓱᓂ ᐊᒥᓱᒐᓴᕐᔪᐊᓄᑦ ᑭᒍᕚᕇᕐᑎᑐᓄᑦ ᑌᑦᓱᒪᓐᖓᓂᐊᓗᒃ.… Read more

    uploaded date: 04-12-2012

  • Kingulliit The Next Generation Blog

    uploaded by: IsumaTV

    Kingulliit The Next Generation Blog is a Related Channel to the site Kingulliit The Next Generation. This related channel documents activities in 2010 and 2011 to move Inuktitut-language multimedia into a new generation of production and distribution through new media and new internet technologies. Starting November 2010, Inuit filmmaker Zacharias Kunuk leads a team to Nunavut communities to show how IsumaTV Hi-speed MediaPlayers boost slow internet to high-speed for over 2000 films on www.isuma.tv. Kunuk also screens in each community his newest documentary film, Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change, by downloading it from the internet using a Hi-speed MediaPlayer. Kunuk travels with Paul Quassa, former president of Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., Canadian rock-star Lucie Idlout and Nunavut filmmaker, David Poisey, to introduce the potential benefits of faster internet for watching over 720 films in Inuktitut among a total of 2000 Inuit and Aboriginal films in 41 languages worldwide. John Hodgins, IsumaTV Technical Manager, installs the Hi-speed MediaPlayers in schools, libraries, youth centres or other locations where people can gain access to IsumaTV’s collection, and where local community videos can be uploaded to the worldwide website. This blog follows the process of their travels and results. Please join us to upload comments, suggestions, videos, photos or other materials relating to bringing Inuit and Aboriginal media out of the past and into the digital future.

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    uploaded date: 25-11-2010