Norman Cohn

Profile

Norman Cohn's picture

Norman Cohn (b. 1946, New York) is currently co-Project Leader with Zacharias Kunuk on Digital Indigenous Democracy, the 2012-13 initiative by Isuma TV and other partners to inform and consult Inuit using new media to improve democratic participation in the Baffinland Iron Mine environmental review. Cohn also is Kingulliit Productions co-founder and president of Isuma Distribution International and IsumaTV; of Kunuk Cohn Productions Inc.; and was one of the four founding partners of Igloolik Isuma Productions Inc. in 1990. Living from 1985-2005 in Igloolik and Montreal, Cohn developed with Kunuk, elder Pauloosie Qulitalik and the late Paul Apak, Isuma’s signature style of ‘re-lived' cultural drama, combining the authenticity of modern video with the ancient art of Inuit storytelling.

Cohn is producer and director of photography for Atanarjuat The Fast Runner, Nunavut (Our Land) and the rest of Isuma’s collective videography; and co-director and co-writer with Kunuk on The Journals of Knud Rasmussen. Before coming to Igloolik Cohn’s solo video exhibition, Norman Cohn: Portraits, opened in 1983 at the Art Gallery of Ontario, Vancouver Art Gallery, National Gallery of Canada, and other Canadian museums, and his experimental non-fiction feature, Quartet for Deafblind (1987), was selected for Dokumenta 7. Winner of a 1990 Guggenheim Fellowship, Cohn was co-winner with Kunuk of the 1994 Bell Canada Award for Outstanding Achievement in Video Art.

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Activity

  • DID working channel

    by: IsumaTV

     <iframe width="640" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/ETD0MlgPE6I" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

     

    PRIVATE channel to use as a working space before going public. 

    03-05-2012

  • Exploring Inuit Culture Online

    by: Gabriela Gamez

    Exploring Inuit Culture ONLINE is a multi-media learning material designed for grades 4-6, to teach students about the Inuit, the native people of the Canadian Arctic, and Nunavut, the newest territory in Canada established in 1999. The Lesson Plans are available in PDF format and can be downloaded.

    15-06-2009

  • IKCC Screenings

    by: IsumaTV

    Book Screenings

    Book screenings, rent or buy copies of Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change from our distributor Vtape. Contact Wanda at +1.416.351.1317 or email wandav@vtape.org.

    06-12-2010

  • In memory: Mariano Abarca Roblero memoria

    by: samcc

    *Para el Español, haga clic en READ MORE*

    Last year in the evening of November 27th 2009, prominent anti-mining activist and community organizer Mariano Abarca Roblero was murdered in front of his home in the Chiapas town of Chicomuselo. He is survived by a wife and four children.

    27-11-2010

  • Kingulliit The Next Generation Blog

    by: IsumaTV

    Kingulliit The Next Generation Blog is a Related Channel to the site Kingulliit The Next Generation. This related channel documents activities in 2010 and 2011 to move Inuktitut-language multimedia into a new generation of production and distribution through new media and new internet technologies. Starting November 2010, Inuit filmmaker Zacharias Kunuk leads a team to Nunavut communities to show how IsumaTV Hi-speed MediaPlayers boost slow internet to high-speed for over 2000 films on www.isuma.tv. Kunuk also screens in each community his newest documentary film, Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change, by downloading it from the internet using a Hi-speed MediaPlayer. Kunuk travels with Paul Quassa, former president of Nunavut Tunngavik Inc., Canadian rock-star Lucie Idlout and Nunavut filmmaker, David Poisey, to introduce the potential benefits of faster internet for watching over 720 films in Inuktitut among a total of 2000 Inuit and Aboriginal films in 41 languages worldwide. John Hodgins, IsumaTV Technical Manager, installs the Hi-speed MediaPlayers in schools, libraries, youth centres or other locations where people can gain access to IsumaTV’s collection, and where local community videos can be uploaded to the worldwide website. This blog follows the process of their travels and results. Please join us to upload comments, suggestions, videos, photos or other materials relating to bringing Inuit and Aboriginal media out of the past and into the digital future.

    25-11-2010

  • My Father's Land

    by: Norman Cohn

    My Father's Land (Attatama Nunanga) by Zacharias Kunuk and Norman Cohn. 163 mins. Inuktitut and English, (c) Kingulliit Productions 2014.

    11-07-2014

  • Norman Cohn Commentary

    by: Norman Cohn

    Sometime commentary or information related to IsumaTV's Digital Indigenous Democracy (DID) by Norman Cohn, DID co-director.

    06-07-2010

  • Norman Cohn Video

    by: Norman Cohn

    Norman Cohn's selected video work 1970-present, channel in progress, stay tuned. 1979-1986: Children in Hospital (3 parts), In my end is my beginning (5 parts); How We Lived (8 parts); Quartet for deafblind.

    05-03-2009

  • Nunatsiaq News Online

    by: Norman Cohn

    Nunatsiaq News, based in Iqaluit and founded in 1973, is an English-Inuktitut weekly newspaper that has served the people of Nunavut and the Nunavik region of Arctic Quebec since 1973. Is it the premier source of news for the Eastern Canadian Arctic and is available in every Nunavut community.

    21-02-2011

  • Paul Apak Expedition Videos

    by: Norman Cohn

    This channel presents Paul Apak's two Expedition Films, Qidtlarssuaq by dogteam from Igloolik to Qanaaq, Greenland; and Umiaq by walrus skin boat from Siberia to Alaska across the Bering Strait. Paul Apak Angilirq (1954-1998) was vice-president and co-founder of Igloolik Isuma Productions in 1990.

    04-09-2008

  • The Films of Alanis Obomsawin: Video on Demand

    by: Norman Cohn

    Alanis Obomsawin, a member of the Abenaki Nation, is one of Canada’s most distinguished documentary filmmakers. Obomsawin's series documenting the 1990 Mohawk uprising in Kanehsatake and Oka begins with Kanehsatake: 270 Years of Resistance (1993), a feature-length film which has won 18 international awards.

    The Oka Crisis

    Four films on the 1990 Mohawk Uprising

    Atanajuat

    View in SD

    More about Alanis | Official website

    Download

    Incident at Restigouche

    Police raid reserve in June 1981.

    Journals of Knud Rasmussen

    View in SD

    More about NFB | Press Materials

    Download

    Is the Crown at war with us?

    Thirty years of Aboriginal filmmaking

    Before Tomorrow

    View in SD

    Filmography | News and Resources

    Download

    12-11-2009

  • 4m 20s

    Maliglutit (Searchers) Teaser

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    channel: Maliglutit (Searchers)

    Maliglutit (Searchers)

    Zacharias Kunuk

    CANADA, 2016

    Nunavut, circa 1913. Kuanana returns from a caribou hunt to discover his wife and daughter kidnapped, and the rest of his family slaughtered. His father's spirit helper, the loon Kallulik, sets him on course to overturn fate and reunite his family.

    28-07-2016

  • 11m 25s

    Ningiuq

    by: Carol Kunnuk

    channel: Igloolik | ᐃᒡᓗᓕᒃ

    In 2009, Rachel Uyarasuk, elder of the Inuit community of Igloolik (Nunavut), evokes the ancestors whose name she received at birth. She explains how this transmission ensured their return among the world of the living.

    A film by Christin Merlhiot

    France, 2014, 11 minutes, animation

    Inuktitut with English & French subtitles

    14-04-2014

  • First Peoples Festival in Peril

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    channel: Isuma News

    Is it possible for First Nations to hold a festival worthy of the name in Québec’s metropolis?

    The Montreal Frist Peoples Festival asks the question a press release distriburted this morning as the Partenariat du Quartier des spectacles (the PQDS), a paramunicipal body that administers a major program in support of events in Montreal’s downtown core cultural district, decided to cut off all grants to the Festival for the year 2014.

    The PQDS claims that the First Peoples Festival lacks sufficiently innovative programming. This is a surprising attack on the Montreal event that has very successfully and continually transformed itself over the years. Since it moved its activities to the Quartier des spectacles, it has offered a brand-new formula that richly highlights First Peoples culture, art and diversity.

    First Peoples Festival is a First Nations’ multi-disciplinary festival, an event unique in its genre and presented yearly by the Terres en vues/Land Insights society for the last 24 years.

    Last year, the festival succeeded in balancing its budget without a deficit although the very day its program was launched, June 18 2013, the PQDS announced a drastic $50 000 cut to the Festival’s budget. This year the festival was been hit with a great blow that could prove to be fatal.

    The festival states that this new obstacle is a test of the commitment of city of Montreal and government stakeholders to make a place for First Nations culture in Quebec’s metropolis and to associate these with the many commemorations set for city’s 375th anniversary in 2017.

    Festival organizers are demanding that those granting funds to the PQDS, the City of Montreal first and then the government of Québec, must take action without delay to reinstate a funding for First Peoples Festival within a structure that can allow it to develop and thrive.

    Moreover, the festival is questioning the very way funding is delivered by the PQSD. Organizers believe that it is high time, as ethical choices, corruption and fair practices are in the spotlight in Montréal during the ongoing Charbonneau Commission, to review the governance of this paramunicipal body that oversees such important budgets.

     

    Source: Land Insights

     

    03-03-2014

  • DID in the News!

    by: Cara Di Staulo

    channel: Isuma News

    On Their Terms: A Digital Project to Give Inuit Say in Developers' Arctic Ambitions

    BY Elisabeth Fraser

    A new project in Canada’s north is attempting to bridge the digital divide facing Inuit communities. In doing so, it hopes to give them a say as developers move to take advantage of their resource-rich land.

    Digital Indigenous Democracy (DID) is an effort to bring the community empowerment of new media technology into remote low-bandwidth indigenous communities in Nunavut, across Canada, and around the world,” says Norman Cohn, an award-winning Canadian filmmaker who is also the project co-director, with partner Zacharias Kunuk, an Inuk filmmaker.

    The idea is to provide high-speed Internet access to Inuit living in northern communities, where extremely low bandwidth access makes surfing the net a slow and cumbersome task. “These people, who most need access to these networks, have the worst cost-per-bandwidth in the civilized world,” says Cohn.

    Life in the Northern communities where Canada’s Inuit live can be challenging. Traditionally, the Inuit are a hunting society. However, nowadays both global warming and opposition from animal-rights groups are negatively affecting the hunt. There are high levels of poverty, substance abuse, and suicide. There is a housing shortage, and high levels of family violence, as well as chronic health problems like diabetes. The remote and vastly scattered locations of these villages carry distinct challenges as well, including sky-high prices on basic goods. Most places are hard to access from the south, accessible via boat during the summer, or by expensive flights year-round. And, despite federal investment to improve bandwidth access in these communities, the Internet remains very slow.

    Just how slow is it? “Most people can remember how the Internet was when they first tried it out five or ten years ago, and how much faster it is now,” explains Cohn. “Use of the Internet we take for granted right now is only possible because our bandwidth has increased by hundreds of thousands of times, and at a low cost. Those speed increases have not impacted northern Inuit communities. Their Internet is among the slowest and most expensive … There is a digital divide, certainly in the Canadian North, as much as in Bangladesh.”

    Canada’s Inuit are one of three Canadian Aboriginal groups (the others are the Métis and First Nations). They are somewhat unique amongst Indigenous peoples in North America, because they have negotiated a self-governing agreement with the federal government of Canada. Whereas Canadian and U.S. First-Nations people often live on government reserves and receive government assistance or a special tax status, Inuit are by and large self-sufficient.

    Cohn says the project is essential to help Inuit protect their rights in a new age of resource extraction. “The origins of this project are in the evolution of two enormous world developments. The one is the evolution of new media technology and its potential for social networking and political change, which we’ve seen in the Middle East,” Cohn says, referencing the Arab Spring. “And this intersects with the evolution of global warming, which has created an increase in natural resource development in the Canadian Arctic.”

    Digital Indigenous Democracy has been financed and tested around a specific giant mining development (the “Mary River Project”) by the Baffinland company.

    “If (the development) goes forward in its full capacity, it would be the largest mine ever in Canada,” says Cohn. DID was created in the context of Baffinland’s ongoing environmental review process, which involves consultation with local stakeholders. These talks have produced an Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement, as required by law under the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement.

    “Our project was proposed and financed to test out this technology as a way of improving Inuit communities’ ability to participate in the decision-making process of such an enormous development that will impact these communities forever,” Cohn says. “So, we had a compelling technological concept for equal justice, but we also had a compelling urgent need for that project to take place as soon as possible.”

    Started in April 2011 via Canada Media Fund financing, Digital Indigenous Democracy went live one year later, in April 2012. It runs on the ISUMA TV platform, created by Cohn and co. in 2008. The multimedia website features photographs and government information documents, as well as audio and video recordings, in English and in Indigenous languages like Inuktitut.

    In addition to putting forward local content, in the form of radio programming, films and documentaries, and community news,DID has played an active part in the local consultations involving the Baffinland project. A series of radio call-in shows allowed locals to ask experts questions about the development, and Baffinland feedback collected via DID has been complied into a report, which will be presented in the next round of public hearings, tentatively scheduled to take place in mid-October.

    Lloyd Lipsett is a human rights lawyer who has been participating in the public consultation process surrounding the Baffinland project. He took part in radio call-in shows the DID group organized in Igloolik, Nunavut, to answer questions and inform locals about the Baffinland project, in English and Inuktitut.

    “If you want the people to be confident that the mine is benefitting them, they need to have the information to make that judgment. It’s important to recognize that the movement towards transparency in the (extractive industry) is really picking up steam,” says Lipsett, who notes the Canadian government has announced it will pass binding regulations ensuring mining companies have greater disclosure towards various levels of government, something the United States and European Union have already done.

    Canadian constitutional law and international law now explicitly confirms Indigenous people have the right to be informed and consulted about any resource development that impacts their lands and their communities. According to Lispett, the new approach towards consultation offered by DID is a benefit to locals and developers alike.

    Most human-rights interventions involving extraction projects happen after development has started, when things are perceived to be going badly. “Getting involved in public hearings before the project has taken place; you are taking a proactive approach,” says Lispett. “You’re dealing with all the different stakeholders, including the company itself. To talk to them in a proactive, forward-looking manner, is much more constructive then pointing your finger after, and saying, “You’re doing this wrong, you’re violating this right, or that right…We’re offering you suggestions as to how you can develop this mine in a way that is respectful to people.”

    The economic stakes are significant, too."The wealth in the arctic is enormous,” says Cohn. “It’s sort of like the new Congo, but suddenly much more accessible than it ever was before. “The world has changed since King Leopold went into the Congo, but only if technology helps people take advantage of those changes. (DID) is the only way Indigenous people will get a real fair seat at the negotiating table, dividing up what everyone agrees are trillions of dollars.”

    Frances Abele is a Professor of Public Policy and Public Administration at Carleton University. She is familiar with the project. She touts the community-building aspect of DID. “If you haven’t been to the North, it’s very hard to picture just how far apart everything is,” she says. “To allow people to speak to each other in real time is a really powerful change in order to have people talk about their common interests, and politics.”

    “The local radio has been very, very, important for a long time, it’s the main way that people find out what’s going on, and they listen to that every day,” says Abele. “The genius of what Norman and Zacharias are doing is that they’ve been able to build on that network to create these communities.”

    Mark Airut is the manager of the Igloolik radio station, now run by ISUMA since last May. He is Inuk, and echoes Abele’s praise for DID. “I think it’s really great, lots and lots of people are now following us, and now they listen to our radio all over the world,” he says. He says since ISUMA took over, the station’s workers have gone from being voluntary to paid staff, and many locals say ISUMA radio is now all they listen to. “We’re doing our best work on educational stuff,” says Airut. “It’s really successful.”

    Currently, Cohn estimates the project is two-thirds completed. “Our website will play at high speed in what will eventually be ten indigenous communities,” he says. ISUMA has been hooking people up since the spring, and will continue to do so during the fall.

    Underlying the entire project is the principal of open data and transparency as a tool to combat inequality. “Indigenous people see these developments as the only chance they have to get out of poverty and into the 21st century,” says Cohn. “If all the people involved are sharing in the exploitation of the resources, then it’s not pejorative. If the people involved are being exploited, then its pejorative … Today, you cannot get away with that level of inequality unless it’s hidden from public view.”

    Cohn believes DID can be a powerful tool to give Indigenous people their fair share of the pie. “If people have those tools, you cannot deny them those rights,” he says. “These communities are sitting on mountains of minerals, of gold, of uranium.” He sees a future for this project in Indigenous communities throughout the world, and notes it is in developer’s interest to properly inform and consult, or risk huge lawsuits down the road.

    How much the Inuit will eventually profit from the Baffinland development remains to be seen, but Cohn is hopeful. “Indigenous people are not genetically impoverished,” he says. “If everyone owned the land they were living on, Inuit people could quite very well be rich,” he argues. “Why are Inuit peoples more like Palestinians than Saudi Arabians? In 2013, you can’t do that to people, unless you’re doing it in the dark.”

    Elisabeth Fraser is a freelance Canadian journalist. She lives in Montreal.

    Personal Democracy Media is grateful to the Omidyar Network and the UN Foundation for their generous support of techPresident's WeGov section.

    www.techpresident.com

     

    30-09-2013

  • 4m 32s

    ᓂᐲᑦ ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ Dr. Zacharias Kunuk O.C. NIRB Formal Intervention Part 2 of 3, 4:32

    by: derekman88

    channel: ᓂᐲᑦ ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ Inuktitut Voice – Inform and Consult

    ᓂᐲᑦ ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ Dr. Zacharias Kunuk O.C. Part 2, 4:32 June 4, 2012, Inuktitut, see also Part 1, see also Part 3, My Father's Land, Formal Intervention to NIRB Final Public Hearing, Mary River Project, (Oral Inuktitut) July 2012; Dr. Zacharias Kunuk film maker, hunter, grandfather talks about growing up and his introduction to films and film making and his Inuk Point of View on mining and development in his father's land.

     

    08-06-2012

  • 46m 34s

    Inuit Cree Reconciliation

    by: Zacharias Kunuk

    channel: Inuit Cree Reconciliation

    Zacharias Kunuk and Neil Diamond team up to research the events and historical impacts of an 18th century conflict between Inuit and Cree in Northern Québec.

    Produced by Kingulliit Productions.

    Screening Information:

    Year:  2013

    Genre:  Documentary

    Length: 45 minutes

    Language: Inuktitut & Cree (English subtitles)

    09-10-2011

  • ARTCO

    by: David Ertel

    ARTCO "Artisans of Today's Communities" is a project led by Kingulliit Productions and IsumaTV where Inuit and Cree children use new media tools to explore their past and present realities, practice collective action and create a better future.

    22-08-2011

  • Distribution

    by: John Hodgins

    These urls are direct links to 1080p h264 files for Isuma Productions. They can be copied (right-click and select "Copy Link Location") and pasted and emailed directly to authorized clients. These urls are specially encoded and stop working after 24 hours from the time you loaded this page. To generate new urls, simply refresh this page.

    This page is a private page and is visible only to it's members. Only people who are acting as distributors for Isuma Productions should have access to this page. Clients who are licensing these videos should be sent the appropriate download urls. They should not be given access to this page.

    Atanarjuat 1080p (english subtitles) part 1
    Atanarjuat 1080p (english subtitles) part 2

    JKR 1080p (english subtitles) part 1
    JKR 1080p (english subtitles) part 2

    BT 1080p (english subtitles) part 1
    BT 1080p (english subtitles) part 2
    BT 1080p (spanish subtitles)
    BT 1080p (french subtitles)

    Tungijuq h264 (431MB)
    Tungijuq MPEG (1.2GB)

    Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change (english subtitles) (2.6 GB)
    Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change (french subtitles) (2.6 GB)

    27-01-2010

  • Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

    by: Ian Mauro

     

    COMMENT or DISCUSS the film

    Video on Demand

    Download in SD

    Download in 720p HD

    Download in 1080p HD

    BOOK A SCREENING, rent or buy the film from Vtape +1.416.351.1317 email wandav@vtape.org.

    About the film

    Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change had its world premiere October 23, 2010, at the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival in Toronto. The complete film also streamed online simultaneously watched by more than 1500 viewers around the world. Following the film, a Q&A with filmmakers Zacharias Kunuk and Dr. Ian Mauro included live call-in by Skype from viewers from Pond Inlet, New York, Sydney, Australia and other locations.

    Nunavut-based director Zacharias Kunuk (Atanarjuat The Fast Runner) and researcher and filmmaker Dr. Ian Mauro (Seeds of Change) have teamed up with Inuit communities to document their knowledge and experience regarding climate change. This new documentary, the world’s first Inuktitut language film on the topic, takes the viewer “on the land” with elders and hunters to explore the social and ecological impacts of a warming Arctic. This unforgettable film helps us to appreciate Inuit culture and expertise regarding environmental change and indigenous ways of adapting to it.

    READ MORE
    Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change had its world premiere October 23, 2010, at the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival in Toronto. The complete film also streamed online simultaneously watched by more than 1500 viewers around the world. Following the film, a Q&A with filmmakers Zacharias Kunuk and Dr. Ian Mauro included live call-in by Skype from viewers from Pond Inlet, New York, Sydney, Australia and other locations.

     

    Nunavut-based director Zacharias Kunuk (Atanarjuat The Fast Runner) and researcher and filmmaker Dr. Ian Mauro (Seeds of Change) have teamed up with Inuit communities to document their knowledge and experience regarding climate change. This new documentary, the world’s first Inuktitut language film on the topic, takes the viewer “on the land” with elders and hunters to explore the social and ecological impacts of a warming Arctic. This unforgettable film helps us to appreciate Inuit culture and expertise regarding environmental change and indigenous ways of adapting to it.

    Exploring centuries of Inuit knowledge, allowing the viewer to learn about climate change first-hand from Arctic residents themselves, the film portrays Inuit as experts regarding their land and wildlife and makes it clear that climate change is a human rights issue affecting this ingenious Indigenous culture. Hear stories about Arctic melting and how Inuit believe that human and animal intelligence are key to adaptability and survival in a warming world.

    Community-based screenings of the film are now being organized across Canada. Stay tuned for more information, new blog posts and videos added to this channel regularly.

    Please feel free to contact us should you like to organize a screening in your area. Email us: isuma@isuma.ca.

    LESS INFO
     

    29-04-2009

  • IsumaTV

    by: IsumaTV

    Radio and Video interviews with the minds behind IsumaTV, and their reflections about its development.

    10-02-2008

  • Kingulliit

    by: Stéphane Rituit

    ᑭᖑᓪᓖᑦ ᐅᖄᕗᖅ ᐃᓄᓐᓂᒃ ᐃᓅᓕᓚᐅᕐᓯᒪᔪᓂᒃ 1900-ᐄᑦ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᕐᖄᕕᓂᖏᓐᓂ 30-ᓂ. ᐊᑦᓯᔭᐅᒪᔪᕕᓃᑦ `ᑭᖑᕚᖑᓕᕐᑐᑦ` ᓯᕗᓪᓕᐹᐅᓐᓂᕋᒥᒃ ᐊᕐᕌᒍᒐᓴᕐᔪᐊᓂ ᓵᑦᓯᓱᑎᒃ ᐊᑦᔨᐅᖏᑦᑐᒥᒃ ᓄᓇᕐᔪᐊᖑᒻᒥᔪᒥᒃ ᐊᓯᑦᔨᓚᐅᕐᓯᒪᓐᖏᑑᑉ ᖃᐅᔨᒻᒫᕆᔭᐅᑦᓱᓂᓗ ᓴᓂᐊᓐᓂᑦ ᑲᒪᒋᔭᐅᓕᓂᒻᒪᕆᐅᑦᓱᓂ ᐊᒥᓱᒐᓴᕐᔪᐊᓄᑦ ᑭᒍᕚᕇᕐᑎᑐᓄᑦ ᑌᑦᓱᒪᓐᖓᓂᐊᓗᒃ.

    04-12-2012

  • Lloyd Lipsett Human Rights

    by: Lloyd Lipsett

    A channel of commentary and documents by Lloyd Lipsett, human rights lawyer and leader of a 2012-13 Human Rights Impact Assessment of the $6 billion Baffinland Iron Mine proposed development in the middle of north Baffin Island.

    07-05-2012

  • Our Baffinland Atlas

    by: Ian Mauro

    ABOUT OUR BAFFINLAND

    The Arctic is warming double the global average, decreasing sea ice, making it easier to access and extract mineral and oil resources from the region, and this cumulative climatic and economic change has significant human and environmental health implications for Inuit and their communities. In Nunavut, the proposed Baffinland Iron Mine, at the site of Mary River, is one of the largest industrial developments ever conceived for the Arctic, and will involve year-round shipping of ore across sensitive permafrost, marine ecosystems and regions of cultural significance that have and continue to be used by Inuit. The Our Baffinland project explores Inuit knowledge regarding mining, and shows a walrus and caribou hunting expedition and associated interviews with elders across this landscape. This digital media presentation highlights the complexities of "Arctic Development".

    CREATIVE TEAM

    A production of: Kingulliit Productions Inc.

    Executive Producers: Norman Cohn and Zacharias Kunuk

    Producers: Zacharias Kunuk, Stéphane Rituit, and Ian Mauro.

    Project Managers: Gabriela Gámez, Gillian Robinson and Ian Mauro

    Creative Directors: Zacharias Kunuk and Ian Mauro

    Technology Director and Programmer: John Hodgins

    Designer and Animator: Marc Labelle

    Video and Photography: David Poisey, Jon Frantz, Zacharias Kunuk and Ian Mauro

    Sound: Tobias Haynes

    Editors: Ian Mauro, Jon Frantz, Craig Norris and Carol Kunnuk

    Translators: Carol Kunnuk and Sarah Arnatsiaq

    Research: Ian Mauro

    PARTNERS AND SUPPORT

    12-09-2013

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