John Hodgins


John Hodgins's picture
Technical Director for IsumaTVSee more



  • Igloolikmiut Community Page

    Igloolikmiut Community Page

    by: IsumaTV

    Igloolik is a Low Bandwidth High Cost internet community. Internet service is 150 times behind southern Canada in cost-per-MB. To overcome this handicap DID installs local server Mediaplayers to deliver high speed media to slow speed users, and broadcasts our internet films and videos to home TV.



Recent Uploads


  • Alianait Arts Festival 2009

    Alianait Arts Festival 2009

    by: John Hodgins

    Created in 2005, Alianait! Arts Festival is one of the biggest cultural events in Nunavut celebrating and connecting cultures through music and arts.

    IsumaTV will broadcast the Alianait Arts Festival live - June 21 to July 1 - everyday from 07PM to 10PM on

    The Festival will kick off on June 21, 2009, National Aboriginal Day, with a free afternoon show which will feature throat singers from Nunavut and Nunavik, Ellen Hamilton & Friends, Johnny Issaluk and the Inuksuk High School Choir.

    The Alianait Opening Concert will follow on June 22nd with:

    • Maanilu Asianilu, a youth Brazilian drumming group from Kangiqsujuak
    • Naujamiut, a traditional Inuit band from Repulse Bay
    • The Bop Ensemble – featuring Canadian folk Shaman Bill Bourne, Wyckham Porteous & Jas Olhauser from Alberta & British Columbia
    • Treasa Levasseur, a smoldering singer-songwriter originally from Winnipeg, backed by guitarist David Baxter and a big sound 5 piece band from Toronto
    • A fantastic Circus collaboration will be presented on Saturday, June 27th featuring Nunavut’s internationally acclaimed Artcirq and Productions Kalabante, an African / Quebecois circus troupe featuring Yamoussa Bangoura

    The Closing Concert on June 30, 2009 will feature:

    • Kaina Nowlak, Iqaluit’s favourite accordionist
    • Liima Inui, rock, reggae, world & pop musicians from Greenland just in time to release a new CD
    • Kobotown, a magic mix of calypso, dub poetry, roots reggae, folk and funk – Trinidad born now living in Toronto
    • Troy MacGillivray & Nuala Kennedy, award-winning Halifax fiddler and enchanting Scottish flautist
    • Productions Kalabante, an amazing collaboration of jazz vocals and African drums

    Contact Info:


    For more details :




  • Angel Street

    Angel Street

    by: IsumaTV

    This site is currently under construction. Please come back soon!



  • Bringing it Back to the Inuit: Zacharias Kunuk for President of QIA

    Bringing it Back to the Inuit: Zacharias Kunuk for President of QIA

    by: Zacharias Kunuk

    Zach's Platform in Inuktitut | Click HERE for Radio Version (faster download)

    Zacharias Kunuk

    More Videos

    Zach's Views in Inuktitut & English

    Zacharias Kunuk

    QIA Platform

    Bringing it Back to the Inuit

    Zacharias Kunuk

    About Zacharias

    More about the candidate.

    VIDEO above in Inuktitut; TEXT below in English

    "My name is Zacharias Kunuk; I was born on the land near Igloolik in Kapuivik on Baffin Island side in 1957. Before I was sent to school, before the age of nine, I saw how we used to live. Sod houses, ice porch and traveling by dog team, Stories I heard at bedtime, I even started to go out with the men, different dog teams. My world ended when I was sent to school in 1966. I got to grade eight; to get higher I had to leave my community which I didn’t want...."

    "We need to educate our Beneficiaries in what QIA was created to do. QIA protects Beneficiaries' rights as Inuit, more than governments of Canada or Nunavut ever can do. As our Regional Inuit Association, QIA should lead in preservation of Inuit Culture and Language, through, art, literature, music, TV, internet, education and promoting Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit, so future generations know who they are and where they came from. No one will preserve our culture for us, if we don’t do it ourselves...."

    Read complete English Platform...




  • Consult by Video

    Consult by Video

    by: John Hodgins

    Consult by Video

    Using video to consult Inuit allows people to think and speak their concerns in their own Inuktitut language. Uploading videos to DID allows Inuit in any community to watch and listen to a wide range of views in a language they understand. DID allows anyone to comment or upload their own videos to respond. This interactive network of discussion adapts modern media technology to the traditional Inuit value of consensus decision-making. All videos on this channel were filed to the NIRB Public Hearings on Baffinland's Mary River Environmental Impact Statement as part of Zacharias Kunuk's Formal Intervention, My Father's Land, to become part of the permanent formal record of the environmental review.



  • DIAMA 2008-2009

    DIAMA 2008-2009

    by: IsumaTV

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    Digitizing the Inuit and Aboriginal Media Archive

    DIAMA preserves irreplaceable Inuit and Aboriginal media archives at risk of being lost. IsumaTV cleans, reformats, digitizes and uploads priceless audio-visual materials collected since the 1970s. DIAMA digitizes up to five sample videos for free and will co-sponsor – with any interested archive – a search for funds to digitize your complete collection. Contact us at

    The archives by Community location // print views_embed_view('channel_map', 'default', '3843'); ?>

    Browsing the archives

    DIAMA was made possible with the support of the Department of Canadian Heritage through the Canadian Culture Online Strategy.

    language == 'fr'): ?> og_groups ?>

    Numériser les archives multimédia des peuples Inuit et indigènes

    DIAMA préserve les archives multimédia irremplaçables des peuples Inuit et indigènes qui sont à risque d’être perdues. IsumaTV nettoie, reformate, numérise and télécharge ces matériels audio-visuels inestimables, rassemblés depuis les années 70. DIAMA peut numériser jusqu’à cinq échantillons gratuitement et s’engage à parrainer en partie – avec n’importe quelle organisme intéressée – une recherche pour trouver les fonds nécessaires pour la numérisation complète de votre archive. Contactez nous à

    Les archives par communauté // print views_embed_view('channel_map', 'default', '3843'); ?>

    Naviguer les archives

    DIAMA a été réalisé grâce à l'appui du ministère du Patrimoine canadien par le biais de Culture canadienne en ligne.



  • Distribution


    by: John Hodgins

    These urls are direct links to 1080p h264 files for Isuma Productions. They can be copied (right-click and select "Copy Link Location") and pasted and emailed directly to authorized clients. These urls are specially encoded and stop working after 24 hours from the time you loaded this page. To generate new urls, simply refresh this page.

    This page is a private page and is visible only to it's members. Only people who are acting as distributors for Isuma Productions should have access to this page. Clients who are licensing these videos should be sent the appropriate download urls. They should not be given access to this page.

    getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'atn.hd.1080p.1.mp4', 86400); print l('Atanarjuat 1080p (english subtitles) part 1', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'atn.hd.1080p.2.mp4', 86400); print l('Atanarjuat 1080p (english subtitles) part 2', $link) . '

    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'jkr.hd.1080p.1.mp4', 86400); print l('JKR 1080p (english subtitles) part 1', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'jkr.hd.1080p.2.mp4', 86400); print l('JKR 1080p (english subtitles) part 2', $link) . '

    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'bt.hd.1080p.1.mp4', 86400); print l('BT 1080p (english subtitles) part 1', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'bt.hd.1080p.2.mp4', 86400); print l('BT 1080p (english subtitles) part 2', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'bt_es_1080.mp4', 86400); print l('BT 1080p (spanish subtitles)', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'bt_es_1080.mp4', 86400); print l('BT 1080p (french subtitles)', $link) . '

    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'tungijuq.1080p.mp4', 86400); print l('Tungijuq h264 (431MB)', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'tungijuq.1080p.mpg', 86400); print l('Tungijuq MPEG (1.2GB)', $link) . '

    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'ikcc.1080.mp4', 86400); print l('Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change (english subtitles) (2.6 GB)', $link) . '
    '; $link = $s3->getAuthenticatedURL('isuma.vod', 'ikcc_fr_1080.mp4', 86400); print l('Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change (french subtitles) (2.6 GB)', $link); ?>



  • Home


    by: John Hodgins

    IsumaTV is a collaborative multimedia platform for indigenous filmmakers and media organizations. Each user can design their own space, or channel, to reflect their own identity, mandate and audience.


    Mediaplayer Distribution Network

    Multimedia Sharing and Customized Channels

    Consultancy and Projects

    Archiving and Video on Demand

    Become a part of IsumaTV!



  • Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

    Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

    by: Ian Mauro


    COMMENT or DISCUSS the film

    Video on Demand

    Download in SD

    Download in 720p HD

    Download in 1080p HD

    BOOK A SCREENING, rent or buy the film from Vtape +1.416.351.1317 email

    About the film

    Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change had its world premiere October 23, 2010, at the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival in Toronto. The complete film also streamed online simultaneously watched by more than 1500 viewers around the world. Following the film, a Q&A with filmmakers Zacharias Kunuk and Dr. Ian Mauro included live call-in by Skype from viewers from Pond Inlet, New York, Sydney, Australia and other locations.

    Nunavut-based director Zacharias Kunuk (Atanarjuat The Fast Runner) and researcher and filmmaker Dr. Ian Mauro (Seeds of Change) have teamed up with Inuit communities to document their knowledge and experience regarding climate change. This new documentary, the world’s first Inuktitut language film on the topic, takes the viewer “on the land” with elders and hunters to explore the social and ecological impacts of a warming Arctic. This unforgettable film helps us to appreciate Inuit culture and expertise regarding environmental change and indigenous ways of adapting to it.

    Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change had its world premiere October 23, 2010, at the imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival in Toronto. The complete film also streamed online simultaneously watched by more than 1500 viewers around the world. Following the film, a Q&A with filmmakers Zacharias Kunuk and Dr. Ian Mauro included live call-in by Skype from viewers from Pond Inlet, New York, Sydney, Australia and other locations.


    Nunavut-based director Zacharias Kunuk (Atanarjuat The Fast Runner) and researcher and filmmaker Dr. Ian Mauro (Seeds of Change) have teamed up with Inuit communities to document their knowledge and experience regarding climate change. This new documentary, the world’s first Inuktitut language film on the topic, takes the viewer “on the land” with elders and hunters to explore the social and ecological impacts of a warming Arctic. This unforgettable film helps us to appreciate Inuit culture and expertise regarding environmental change and indigenous ways of adapting to it.

    Exploring centuries of Inuit knowledge, allowing the viewer to learn about climate change first-hand from Arctic residents themselves, the film portrays Inuit as experts regarding their land and wildlife and makes it clear that climate change is a human rights issue affecting this ingenious Indigenous culture. Hear stories about Arctic melting and how Inuit believe that human and animal intelligence are key to adaptability and survival in a warming world.

    Community-based screenings of the film are now being organized across Canada. Stay tuned for more information, new blog posts and videos added to this channel regularly.

    Please feel free to contact us should you like to organize a screening in your area. Email us:





  • John's Workspace

    John's Workspace

    by: John Hodgins

    test channel

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  • LIVE on IsumaTV from Igloolik, Nunavut to the COP15 Copenhagen Climate Change Conference

    LIVE on IsumaTV from Igloolik, Nunavut to the COP15 Copenhagen Climate Change Conference

    by: John Hodgins

    Program and schedule of the broadcast (time zone: EST, UTC -5 hours)

    12noon - 1pm: Live from Igloolik in the Canadian Arctic. Join Zacharias Kunuk, Dr Ian Mauro and elder Augustin Taqqaugaq for an active conversation about their recent work submitted to the United Nations Indigenous Voices on Climate Change Film Festival in Copenhagen, Denmark. Audience is invited to join Zach and Ian through Skype using their Skype ID: InuitKNowledgeAndClimateChange .

    1pm - 2pm: Siila Watt-Cloutier's Lecture delivered in May 2009 in Iqaluit as part of the 9th Lafontaine-Baldwin Symposium. Siila is a renowned Canadian Inuit activist and she launched the world's first international legal action on climate change. You can see the interviews on which the legal action was based at this address:

    2pm - 3pm: Live from Igloolik in the Canadian Arctic. Join Zacharias Kunuk and  Dr Ian Mauro in an engaging conversation about Inuit knowledge and climate change with elder Augustin Taqqaugaq and invitees joining in on Skype. Audience is invited to join Zach and Ian through Skype using their Skype ID: InuitKNowledgeAndClimateChange .

    3pm - 5pm: COP15's Indigenous voices on climate change film festival organized in Copenhagen by the United Nations University

    PDF of the festival:

    IsumaTV is proud to be associated with this project and to present the following program:

    3pm to 4pm: Indigenous voices on climate change film festival organized in Copenhagen

    - Adaptation to climate change by Mphunga Villagers in Malawi

    - Coping with rougher seas - Bangladesh

    - Drought: the death of Life - Iran

    - Climate change refugees - Carteret Islands, Papua New Guinea

    - Energy of the Pamir Mountains - Tajikistan

    - Farmer to farmer learning in a changing climate - Ethiopia

    4pm to 5pm: Indigenous voices on climate change film festival organized in Copenhagen

    - Kuna Yala, Panama

    - Pamiri women and the melting glaciers of Tajikistan

    - Sea level rise in Kowanyama - Cape York, Australia

    - Ama divers: where the sea whistle echoes - Japan

    - Sorghum: a crop of our ancestors - Madagascar

    - The forbidden forest of the Dayak - Borneo, Indonesia

    - Walking on country with spirits: biodiversity loss in Australia's wet tropics

    5pm - 6pm: Siila Watt-Cloutier's Lecture delivered in May 2009 in Iqaluit as part of the 9th Lafontaine-Baldwin Symposium.

    Siila is a renowned Canadian Inuit activist and she launched the world's first
    international legal action on climate change. You can see the interviews on which the legal action was based at this address:


    6pm - 7pm: A compilation of shorts, documentary and fiction related to climate change from IsumaTV

    - Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change, a 15min extract of the upcoming feature length documentary

    - Town hall meeting held in Iqaluit in May 2009 for the Lafontaine-Baldwin Symposium: an intervention from Meeka Mike

    - Town hall meeting held in Iqaluit in May 2009 for the Lafontaine-Baldwin Symposium: an intervention from Bernadette Dean quoting elders

    - Old Peter: a short documentary taking us to the world of Old Peter, the last surviving Shaman of the Kazym River, Russia

    - Speaking out on climate change: a silent film made by Pangnirtung's Julie Alivaktuk brilliantly pokes fun at the very serious issue of climate change and how it affects Arctic ecosystems and Inuit people. This film was developed through the Inuusivut project ( )

    - Aputili: a short film by Roselynn Akulukjuk from Pangnirtung, Nunavut. A local elder talk to us about climate change: riveting stories about her life and the changes that she has seen. This film was developed through the Inuusivut project ( )

    - Tungijuq: a short drama starring Tanya Tagaq and Zacharias Kunuk. A thought-provoking meditation on the seal-hunt and what it means to the traditional way of life for Inuit.

    7pm - 8pm: COP15's Indigenous voices on climate change film festival organized in Copenhagen by the United Nations University

    PDF of the festival:

    IsumaTV is proud to be associated with this project and to present the following program:

    - Fighting carbon with fire - Arnhem land, Australia

    - Finding a place to feed: Kyrgyzstan shepherd family & pasture loss

    - Inuit knowledge and climate change - Nunavut, Canada

    - Ama divers: where the sea whistle echoes - Japan

    - Maasai and climate change

    - Our fight against the dunes - Madagascar

    - Rediscovering Altai's human-nature relationships - Russia

    8pm - 10pm: Live from Igloolik in the Canadian Arctic. Join Zacharias Kunuk and Dr Ian Mauro in an engaging conversation about Inuit knowledge and climate change with elder Augustin Taqqaugaq and invitees joining on Skype. Audience is invited to join Zach and Ian through Skype using their Skype ID: InuitKNowledgeAndClimateChange .




  • More Voices on Inuit Knowledge & Climate Change

    More Voices on Inuit Knowledge & Climate Change

    by: IsumaTV

    Additional Voices on Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change are being uploaded every day to the channel Some in Inuktitut, others in English.

    More discussion about Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change, other related human rights issues, see also IKCC at



  • Multimedia and Human Rights

    Multimedia and Human Rights

    by: John Hodgins


    Today's legal obligation to "Inform and Consult" must be met in a language people understand using the best technology available. Audio and video interactive new media allow oral spoken Inuktitut to be the main language used to inform and consult Inuit by internet. The Baffinland Mary River multimedia HRIA delivers Inuktitut media by internet in a Human Rights legal framework to the Nunavut Impact Review Board (NIRB) Mary River Environmental Review. This demonstrates the value of new media in regulation of northern resource developments hoping to meet 21st century constitutional and international standards of Human Rights.




  • Nunavut Language Summit 2010

    Nunavut Language Summit 2010

    by: Stéphane Rituit

    Nunavut Language Summit
    Our language brings us together
    Iqaluit February 9-12, 2010-01-06

    ᓄᓇᕗᒻᒥ ᐅᖃᐅᓯᕐᒧᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᕐᔪᐊᕐ ᓂᖅ
    ᐃᖃᓗᐃᑦ, ᕕᕈᐊᕆ 8-12, 2010

    Nunavunmi uqauhivut atauhiutjutivutlu
    Iqaluit, iitjirurvia 9-12, 2010

    Le sommet de la langue du Nunavut
    Notre langue, c'est ce qui nous rassemble
    Iqaluit, 9-12 février, 2010



    ᐅᖃᐅᓯᕐᒧᑦ ᑲᑎᒪᓂᐅᔪᒧᑦ ᐅᖃᐅᓯᕗᑦ ᐊᑕᐅᓯᐅᔾᔪᑎᕗᑦ!

    Nunavunmi Uqauhikkut Katimaryuarnirmut - Uqausivut Atausiujjutivut!


    Nunavut Language Summit – Our Language Brings Us Together!

    Sommet de la Langue du Nunavut – Notre Langue, c’est ce qui nous rassemble!



    ᐃᖃᓗᐃᑦ, ᓄᓇᕗᑦ            Iqaluit, Nunavut


    ᕕᕗᐊᕆ 8-12, 2010        Fipyuali 8-12, 2010

    February 8-12, 2010     Du 8 au 12 février 2010


    ᕗᕉᐱᓱ ᐃᓐ ᑲᑎᒪᕝᕕᐊᓂ
    Frobisher Inn Hiniktarviup Miitirviani
    Frobisher Inn Conference Center
    Centre des congrès Frobisher Inn





  • Our Viewers Today

    Our Viewers Today

    by: John Hodgins

    language == 'fr'): ?>

    Les ballons rouges représentent des utilisateurs en ligne. Cliquez sur les ballons pour voir les détails de l'emplacement.

    language == 'es'): ?>

    Los globos rojos muestran a quienes ven IsumaTV en este momento. Haz click en cualquier globo para ver más información.

    Red balloons are current viewers. Click on any balloon to see location details.



  • The 9th Annual LaFontaine-Baldwin Symposium

    The 9th Annual LaFontaine-Baldwin Symposium

    by: IsumaTV

    LIVE on IsumaTV May 29th 7:45pm - 10 pm EST


    Click more info for more information about this live webcast.

    - Opening Ceremony

    - Word of Welcome from Her Excellency the Right Honourable Michaëlle Jean, Governor General of Canada

    - Presentation of the winners of a photo competition by Dr Zacharias Kunuk O.C.

    - Presentation of the LaFontaine-Baldwin Symposium by John Ralston Saul

    - Introduction of Siila Watt-Cloutier by the Honourable Ann Meekitjuk Hanson, Commissioner of Nunavut

    - SIILA WATT-CLOUTIER, Inuit climate activist and 2007 Nobel Peace Prize nominee, speaking LIVE from Iqaluit on Inuit Knowledge, Human Rights and Climate Change.

    - Q&A and Inuit entertainment.



    is a presentation of

    the Institute for Canadian Citizenship and The Dominion Institut

    This webcast live on IsumaTV from Iqaluit, Nunavut is made possible with the support of

    SSI Micro




  • The Fast Runner Trilogy

    The Fast Runner Trilogy

    by: John Hodgins

    Three unique Inuit films expressing the dramatic history of one of the world’s oldest oral cultures from it’s own point of view.
    “A masterpiece... The first national cinema of the 21st century.” – A.O. Scott, NY Times review of Atanarjuat The Fast Runner, 2002.

    Atanarjuat The Fast Runner

    2001 Camera d'Or, Cannes




    More about film | Companion website

    Download in SD

    Download in 720p HD

    Download in 1080p HD

    The Journals of Knud Rasmussen

    2006 Opening Night Film, Toronto

    Journals of Knud Rasmussen



    More about film | Companion website

    Download in SD

    Download in 720p HD

    Download in 1080p HD

    Before Tomorrow

    2009 World Cinema Competition, Sundance

    Before Tomorrow



    More about film | Companion website

    Download in SD

    Download in 720p HD

    Download in 1080p HD



  • The National Film Board of Canada

    The National Film Board of Canada

    by: NFB

    The National Film Board of Canada (NFB) is Canada's public film producer and distributor.

    For over 70 years, the NFB has created socially engaged documentary, auteur animation, alternative drama and more.

    Along the way, we’ve crafted over 12,000 productions and received more than 5000 awards, including 12 Oscars® and more than 90 Genies.

    Today, we’re at the crossroads of innovation in the 21st century, bringing a tradition of trailblazing to the multi-platform digital universe.

    Visit our website to watch over 700 documentaries and animated films :

    If you want to get in touch, you can contact us here:



  • Transmediale


    by: Gabriela Gamez


    On January 28 2009, Zacharaias Kunuk delivered the annual Marshal McLuhan Lecture to the Berlin Transmediale live on IsumaTV from Iqaluit to the lecture hall in Berlin, including an interactive Q & A.




  • Tungijuq


    by: Stéphane Rituit

    What We Eat: Inuit jazz throat-singer Tanya Tagaq, and Cannes-winning filmmaker Zacharias Kunuk, talk back to Brigitte Bardot and anti-sealhunting lobby on the eternal reality of hunting.

    Selected for Sundance, Toronto International Film Festival, Best Short, imagineNATIVE Film Fest 2009.

    BOOK A SCREENING, rent or buy the film from Vtape +1.416.351.1317 email

    Download Tungijuq VOD




Recent Uploads

  • Asiu (Lost)

    Asiu (Lost)

    by: Artcirq

    channel: Artcirq

    Footage from Artcirq's performance of ASIU (Lost) at the 2014 edition of the Alianait Arts Festival in Iqaluit.

    Asiu is Artcirq's latest show and is inspired by the traditional Inuit legend Amaqup Nunaat (The Land of Wolves) about two brothers who find themselves lost in the mysterious world of the Shadow People.





  • Ningiuq


    by: Carol Kunnuk

    channel: Igloolikmiut Community Page

    In 2009, Rachel Uyarasuk, elder of the Inuit community of Igloolik (Nunavut), evokes the ancestors whose name she received at birth. She explains how this transmission ensured their return among the world of the living.

    A film by Christin Merlhiot

    France, 2014, 11 minutes, animation

    Inuktitut with English & French subtitles





  • Peter Irniq Testimony

    Peter Irniq Testimony

    by: Zacharias Kunuk

    channel: Truth and Reconciliation

    Click on 'Read More' for English Translation of Testimony by Peter Irniq, May 2008

    English Translation of Testimony by Peter Irniq, May 12, 2008, Iglulik, Nunavut

    Peter Irniq: We had a terrible Hudson’s Bay Trader back in 1956, like many of these people, were terrible. That summer in 1956, the Dew Line ships came and when left later on, they left a whole lot of material. Some things like pellets beach along the shore line, so one day, my father and Celestino and his father, walked over to where these pellets were beached, with the idea of taking them back to our tent. When we got there, the two adults, Celestino’s father and my father tie up the pellets with a seal skin rope, and Celestino’s father, started to pull the pellets back to his tent. Right at this point, this Bay Manager came along with his Jeep. With his was his girlfriend, even though, he was married. Well, me I took a beached light bulb, that was no longer going to be used, as I wanted it as my toy. Just when the Bay Manager was coming up, my father said to Amarualik, who was pulling the pellets, back to his tent. “He’s coming to get you!” meaning, the Bay Manager. He dropped his load and ran like heck to his tent, running away from the Bay Manager. My father waited for the Bay Manager to stop. When he stopped, he ordered my father not to touch the pellets. “Don’t touch those pellets, they will be used again.” My father responded in Inuktitut that translated into something like this: “You are a big lyer!” Then, he pointed to the woman inside the jeep and said to the Bay Manager, “she will be used again, stop being with her!”

    That night Amarualik came over to visit and while drinking tea, they had a great big laugh about what happened that day. All they wanted to do was to use the pellets for qamutiik(sleigh) cross bars. The thing was, nothing was going to happen to the two men or the two of us boys. They were also not going to re-use the burned out light bulbs.

    Zach Kunuk: Perhaps, you could tell a story about where you were born.

    Peter Irniq: Yes, I was born in Naujaarjuat(A place of plentiful seagulls fledgelings) Lyon Inlet. My parents are known around here in the Amittuq, particularly by Elders. My father’s name was Angutitaq and my mother’s name was Katak. My sister’s name was Iguttaq. My older brother’s name was Ipuittuq Ivaluqut. Prior to my birth, they used to live around here. They lived here, perhaps from around 1940 to about 1946. At that particular period of time, they traveled by dog team from Gjoa Haven’s Utkuhiksalik(Back River) to Naujaat’s Ukkusiksalik(Repulse Bay’s Wager Bay). They lived there for a time, then they traveled this way through Naujaat-Repulse Bay, Sanirajak(Hall Beach) and then to Iglulik. They traveled all the way here, by dog team only. They used to talk a lot about people from this Region. When I became an adult, I got to meet the people they met and I used to say to myself, “oh those are the people, that my parents used to talk about”.

    Over there, we never lived really in the community of Naujaat – the Settlement, as we were true Inuit, living off the land traditionally. We were true Inuit, with truly living the Inuit traditional ways. For example, for those watching us, we lived much like the ones that Isuma Produced sometime ago, Nunavut Series. The ones you guys made. At these scenes in the spring time, that is exactly how we used to live. We used to look for eggs, when there were eggs. And also, we hunt young mature seals, called Nattiat in the spring time as well. We went fishing, when it was time to fish. My father fished with kakivaak(fish leisters), that is how, he used to catch fish. He used to do this on the rivers and on the lake ice. He used iqaluujaq(fish inviter without a hook). As you pull the iqaluujaq up and down, just like jigging for fish, the fish would come, and my father would spear the fish down below, with his kakivaak. He used to catch a lot of fish, along with my brother-in-law at that time.

    I grew up in a place called Nattiligaarjuk(a lake that has seals) Committee Bay. We used to fish there and we also used to fish at saputit(fish dam) built across the rivers to trap the fish, from going up stream. We fished just like in the films that you made. I used to participate in fishing, when I was just a little boy. When I started to learn how to fish at saputit, it was always hard to get some kakivaak material, such as muskox horns. That is what the kakivaak were made of. So, instead of using the precious kakivaak that the adults were using, my father used to make me kakivaak out of old fox traps. He fashioned them just like the real thing. We had no muskox around Naujaat either, so it was hard to get the real stuff to make the kakivaak. There is still not much muskox, perhaps you see one in the long run.

    Up there, when we would fish at saputit in the mornings and in the evenings, there would be lots and lots of fish(Arctic Char). We would be spearing all the fish. I was a young boy at that time around 1952 or 53. When I was fishing inside the saputit, the water used to go up to my chest, so I was pretty small, fishing with my father and my brother in law. When my father and my brother-in-law were wading in the saputit, the water was just up to their knees. I guess, I was pretty small then. When I would spear a fish, I would pull the wooden handle of the leisters, towards my mother, who was on the dry land, then she would pull the fish on to the dry land. That was how I used to catch fish.

    I remember when we were fishing one evening. It was so much fun and it was so wonderful! I remember being hit by a big fish, right behind my knee or at the back of my knee. That hurt really, really bad. When the fishing was finished that evening, my mother and I decided to look at my leg, I had a really big bruse(sp). Ouch!! It was painful! The reason for this was that the fish were swimming very fast all over, inside the saputit.

    I also remember another story. It was a beautiful day and when we looked at the saputit from our tent, the fish were almost jumping up above the water. There were so much fish! I remember it was a beautiful day, sunny and hot. As a rule, my mother woke me up very early, so that we could all go fishing. When everyone else had left to the saputit to fish, I stayed behind. I was thinking that I didn’t wanted to leave the nice warm bed inside the tent, after all, I was a young child. I was going to go along with everyone but I decided not to go, as I really wanted to stay in bed. The bed was too cozy to leave!

    After the fishing was done, everyone had came back to the tent. My mother was extremely angry with me. She was trying to teach me how to fish at saputit, and teach me how to fish. She then, spanked me quite a few times on my bum. That hurt very much. Every since then, I learned my lesson and tried to be obedient as I did not wanted to be spanked again. We Inuit, when we were spanked once, we would learn a great deal of lesson. Spanking was one of the ways of disciplining someone, it allowed us Inuit to be listenful, that was how it used to be.

    The other thing was when the days would now begin to get dark in the evenings, and you could see the stars in the darken sky, and it was now obvious that the fish had stopped swimming upsteam. Now then, the little ducklings were swimming, with their mothers the sea water. My father would have an age-old knowledge, that they are now swimming in the sea, it was time to move inland to search for caribou. At this point, the caribou fur or hair was just right for making clothes, and there is now lots of tunnuq(fat) on the caribou. We would then practice our traditional methods of hunting caribou through “tagjarniq”, “nunarpangniq” in your Amitturmiut dialect, “moving inland”. We would do this on foot and walked many miles in search of caribou for survival of our family, dogs and for our clothing and winter supply of food. As a child, this walking on the land was very boring. Adults would be carrying heavy loads on their backs of our belongingss, such as tents, beddings, etc. The husky dogs on the other hand, would be carrying our other supplies as well on their backs, such as tents, kettles, food we had to survive on. When I would get tired, “kaka” me, by putting me on his back, and carry me, along with all the load that he was carrying on his back. When I was no longer tired, I would again start running back and forth, in front of family.

    Up where we used to live in Nattiligaarjuk(Committee Bay), we lived all of the seasons. At one point, when we were inland, walking on this big sandy area, that extended many miles. Well, as I was walking and running ahead of the others, I noticed a little black spot ahead of me on this sandy surface. I ran towards it and when I got to it, it was one side of muskox horn. It was so old that it had lichen on it. It means, it was there for quite a while. I grabbed it and then here I ran back as fast as I could towards my father, mothers and other members of my family, to show off my find. I gave it to my father. My father was ever so thankful for me, for finding such a treasure, now, he could make a kakivak out of it. At his spare time, when the days were not good for hunting, he would patiently make a kakivak(fish liester) out of it.

    During this particular period, which was in the fall time, my mother would sew all our caribou clothing, preparing them for winter use. On the other hand, men did cache the meat and fat for the winter supply. I truly love to eat the tunnuq(fat) and marrow. It’s amazing, how much I love to eat the caribou fat and marrow. I used to truly enjoy eating the patiq(the marrow). One time, my mother made me eat lots of patiq. I ate so much of it that, I got sick and had enough of it. Again, she was teaching me a lesson, not to eat too much of it. Since that experience, I don’t like to eat as much patiq as I used to, but still I like them, including the tunnuq. I also enjoy eating “kiksautit” and “iluit”, the caribou guts. These are the most delicious parts of the caribou. I also used to enjoy eating the eyes and ears of the caribou. These were the kinds of things I used to crave for, when I was a little boy. These were the delicacies for the little boys, like myself, when I was a little boy. To this day, whenever I go out caribou hunting on the land, I still eat the ears and eyes of the caribou. To me, that taste of a good delicacy is still there. My thought sometimes instantly returns to Inuit culture and traditions. This is how, I grew up in and around Naujaat.

    In the winter time, I remember my father and others used to hunt seals very traditionally through the “agluit” “seal breathing holes”. They used very traditional hunting methods in those days, using only a downed hair of a bird, as an indicator when the seal would be coming to breathe through it’s seal hole. They also used a small thin piece of metal, which was lowered to the seal hole, to know when the seal would be breathing and then, it was time to harpoon it. They could not see the seal breathing, as all the seal holes were covered with snow during this period of time, which was normally in the month of March, when the days were getting longer. As a young man, I learned the techniques and I hunted using these thousands of year old methods. That was part of my life. In 1961, when my father decided against me going back to a residential school in Chesterfield Inlet, this period of my time was a really awesome period for learning about my own culture. Hunting with “qiviutaq”s birds downs and savgutaujaqs(thin metal) indicator of when the seal was coming up to breathe, these are one of the many things, I learned from my father about my culture. I learned a great deal from my parents, sometimes learning about Inuit myths and legends, listening to them telling stories about these was one of the most pleasant past times.

    I used to ask my father to tell Inuit legends. Sometimes, he would tell a story about Kiviu, Inuit legend, who journeyed through many places. He would tell a story about Sakaliktuarjuk, a poor hunter who fooled every one in the village, that he was actually a good hunter. He would tell a story about Akturraarnaat, an evil mother, whose son was blind. My mother would tell a story about a sister and brother, who became thunder and lightening. These are the things I grew up with, as a young child. I learned about traditional pisiit(songs). My mother, father, my sister and my brother-in-law were very good sings, so I used to listen to them singing, traditional songs. I grew up to become an adult, knowing some knowledge about traditional songs of the Inuit and know how to sing some songs, to this day. I also have some knowledge about shamans. I used to watch my brother-in-law, practicing his healing of the sick. He was a shaman. My brother-in-law used his powers to heal the sick, using his angakkuuni(being shaman) techniques. My father, on the other hand, used to say, that he was not a shaman. Later on, I learned, people used to talk about him, that he was also an angakkuq. He was an extremely good hunter. He used to say, “out there” there must be something that we could see in terms of animals such as caribou. He would repeat this often, to the point where, it was repeated too often. He then, used to tell a story about spirits of angakkuit(shamans).

    He used to tell stories about some Inuit who had birds for spirits. Some other people had other spirits, such as wolves, and Nanurluk(a polar bear spirit). Others used to have human beings as spirits. Sometimes, they used their parents, normally deceased as their spirits, such as mothers or fathers or other relatives. My father used to tell us a story about having a ptarmigan for spirit, and how unpleasant this was, when flying. He said, this is because, they not only fly very fast but flew all over the place. It seemed like, you can hit a hill or something. He said, he used to hear this from other people. He said, other hand, having an ukpigjuaq(an owl) for a spirit, they are very easy to fly with. He said, they would fly high up in the sky and can look both ways. And they could see everything and anything down on the ground. I used to think later on that maybe he was talking about himself. Maybe, he used to fly, but we just didn’t see him fly. This was probably how, he used to know where these animals are, that are “out there”. When he finally goes over to the land, that he was talking about repeated, sure enough, there was caribou. He was like that. I grew up learning by observing all the things about Inuit cultre.

    In the summer time, as children, we used to go down to the beach when the tide was low, looking for Kanajuit(sea scorpions or scanvenger fish with large mouth). Sometimes, we used the go down, when pieces of broken ice were on the beach. We could start to hear the “qallupilluit”, they would be knocking again the ice or the ground. Qallupilluit are spirits, and cannot really be seen by any human being, unless you have extra ordinary powers, such as shaman. My father said, they had feathers like ducks. When we were children, like my friend, the late Simon Aglak, we used to like to go down and look for kanajuit. We used to live on the east side of Naujaat, at Kuugaarjuk, quite a bit of distance from Naujaat. When the tide was low, Simon and I used to look for kanajuit. We used Inuit Traditional Knowledge, looking for these kanajuit. Sometimes, when we would be walking close to the ice, qallupilluq(single) would begin pounding against the ice. When that happens, my mother would yell and say, “you might be gotten by a qallupilluq, come up to the land here”. When you were going to sleep at nights, as long as there was ice around, you could hear the qallupilluit pounding against the ice.

    When we were looking for kanajuit, my mother also used to say, when you are out there, and if you see a “nipisa”(a round-shaped black fish with sticky pad protruding from throat with which it clings on to things, or sticks to your hand, like a scotch tape). My mother would say, the only way to take it off is with an ulu(a half-moon) woman’s knife. One time, when Simon Aglak and I were looking for kanajuit, I lifted the rock to see if there were Kanajuit, and all of a sudden, I saw this fish, I grabbed a hold of it, and it got stuck on the palm of my hand. My mother carefully, took it off with her ulu. That was how, I grew up as a child, with my parents in Naujaat.

    Ever since I can remember, I used to hear about other Inuit from Uqsuqtuuq(Gjoa Haven) Region, Qairnirmiut(the people of Baker Lake area), Talurruaq, my father used to live within those regions. I used to hear about our fellow-Inuit in those areas. I grew up as a true Inuk, living in an iglu in the winter time. While living in an iglu, it can be old at times, especially when there was no oil on the qulliq(Inuit oil lamp). When you live on the sea coast, you used seal fat to light your qulliq. But when you are on the land, or inland, you would have a small oil lamp, that you carried with you. Since there was no seals on the land, my mother would use tunnuq(caribou fat) to light the small qulliq. She used to light the qulliq when she was going to sew our clothes in the evenings. We also used to chew the caribou fat to make candles. We used them for lights in the evenings. This is how I grew up in the Aivilik Region of Nunavut. When I was growing up, I grew up with much happiness and with wonderful things happenings. That was my cycle of life.

    Zack Kunuk: What is it your Inuktitut name?

    Peter Irniq: Taqtu Irniq, those are my Inuktitut names. My mother used to tell a story of her dream, when they lived in Maluk&ittat/Naujaarjuat or Lyon Inlet. She said, she dream’t about this Irniq. That Irniq had relatives in Naujaat as well here in Amittuq. He lived in that area around 1940 or 47. In her dream, my mother said, this Irniq wanted to be named in me. She said, her dream was almost life-like or as though she was awake. We were not related at all. This is why, I was named after that Irniq. Taqtu on the other hand, belonged to a lady relative of ours in Naujaat. When I was born, she named me after that special lady named Taqtu. When I was born and getting older, I remember calling her, “Taqtuuqatiga” “my fellow Taqtu”. This was part of Inuit culture that we practiced. To this day, whenever I talk about her, I refer to her as “Taqtuuqatiga”. This is very important aspect of Inuit culture. I only have two Inuit names. On the other hand, when I was born in 1947 and baptized by a Roman Catholic priest, I was named Pierre. Inuit called the priest Kajualuk(because his big beared was brown) so Inuit called him Kajualuk, translated to “Big Brown”. When I was going to a residential school, I became to be called as Peter, by the Qablunaat(White people).

    Zack Kunuk: When you still a true Inummarik, I guess, you would never pronounce the names of the older people? You would have calling titles for them, “tur&urautiit?”

    Peter Irniq: Yes, particularly, the old, old people, people who were much older than us. They were the fellow-Elders of my parents, my father. We were taught from never to call them by name. Even, if we did not have calling titles for them, we were told not to call them by their names. We respected their Elderships and their ages. It was like honoring them. As children, we were told not to call the older people, those who were older than us, by names. Some we had calling titles for them, and even when they were not related to us for example, we would call them, “my avvakuluk” “my dear little same name”. “My uncle over there”. We had different calling titles for them. “My same-age or equal-age person”. When people were named after certain individuals, we naturally had calling for each other. We were taught to respect and honor. When an Elder came into our tent, and I was sitting down, I was to stand up immediately and allow the Elder to sit down. I was told, do this, without being told.

    Zack Kunuk: When was it that you were sent off to school?

    Peter Irniq: Some Naujaarmiut(people from Naujaat) were sent off to school around 1953, 54 and 55. In those days, they were being sent to school in Igluligaarjuk(Chesterfield Inlet). As for me, I knew I was never going to school. I knew this because, I grew up as a true Inummarik, and knew that I would live an adult life as a true Inuk, a hunter, fisher, and trapper. Ones that are older than I am, they started going to school around 1954-55-57 to Chesterfield Inlet. It was around that time. For me, going to school was something that I was not prepared for as we never lived in a community with other people. My father used to say that living in a community, all you get is welfare from the Qablunaat. He didn’t want to be like that. He always wanted to be close to animals for food and clothing. We lived in Naujaat, I think, only two times, once in 1956 and another time in 1957. At that time, my fellow-youth, were being sent off to a residential school. As for me personally, we living in Tinujjivik(a favorite fishing spot of the Inuit in the spring time, when the fish were swimming down stream). We living there in the summer time and it was in the month of August. It was a time of year when the days were really beautiful, sunny and hot. Tinujjivik is not visible from Naujaat, but if you live in Naujaat, you could see in the distance, the outpost of Tinujjivik. It is around 13 miles west of Naujaat. Tinujjivik is a place for fishing. In the spring time, people would build saputit and when the tide is low, the Arctic Char would be trapped inside the saputit, and that was how we used to fish at Tinujjivik. We would move there in the spring time and moved a short distance to the east, where there are more seals in the area.

    Well, that summer of 1958, we could see a boat coming, with an engine. We could see it very clearly, as it was a very beautiful day. As our custom goes, my mother started to make tea by burning heathers, as this was a summer time. We only used heather and other moss to boil tea in those days. It was such a wonderful feeling that we are having some visitors, so she decided to make tea to welcome the visitors. Then they beached the boat. As they beached, we walked down to the beach to greet the visitors, and all of us, walked down behind my father. But that father, a priest, the late Father Dedier, came off the boat, first. He came off the boat, and said to my father, “Peter Irniq is going to school in Igluligaarjuk so we came to pick him up”. He didn’t even greet my father by shaking hands! I have never seen my father panicked but at that point, he was panicky. So he ordered me by saying, “they came to get you, go put on some nicer clothes”. My mother and I quickly went back to our tent and she made me put on niururiak, a seal skin boots, with the fur outside. I got all dressed up in my best, and off we went to Naujaat. The visitors didn’t have tea. As Inuit, they would have stopped to have tea, if they were regular visitors, then leave after they had tea. I don’t have any idea why this happened the way it did. I wondered, if the priest had told them earlier that, before anything happens, we should leave immediately. I don’t know. When we were traveling towards Naujaat, my goodness, it was lonely. It was the loneliest time of my life! It was too awesome!

    Zack Kunuk: You then, left your parents?

    Peter Irniq: “Yes!”

    It comes back instantly! My parents, my sister and brother-in-law, and my little brother, who died in later years, my niece, I watched them, as we are traveling farther and farther away from them. They were all standing by the shore, seeing me off, until I was no longer visible by eye. Wow! Perhaps, it’s that particular incident, when I was suddenly taken away, it’s been long time ago, since 1958, to me, it comes back quite suddenly, to the time I was a child. That very part, it is very difficult to become adult with. You stayed a child forever! Even though, I am a old person now, but sometimes, you have to returned to it, or re-visit it, instantly. And so, we were on our way to Naujaat.

    Zack Kunuk: How old were you at that time?

    Peter Irniq: Eleven. Yes, I was 11 years old, when I was taken away. So, we were traveling towards Naujaat. I watched my parents, as they were no longer visible by eye sight. They were still standing on the beach. They were also watching until we were no longer visible in the horizon. When we finally got to Naujaat, I was made to go to Angutinguaq family. My father and Angutinguaq were cousins. So I was to stay with this family, according to the wishes of the Roman Catholic Church. They were the adoptive parents of Jack Anawak. We had been here for some days, I guess my parents would watch from where they were, to see if the plane had come and coming to land in the water in Naujaat. Even though, Naujaat was some distance away, they could see airplanes from where they were. Since, they did not see any planes landing in Naujaat, a few days later, my father and my brother-in-law, came over by canoe with an outboard motor. When they arrived, it was so wonderful! Since they arrived, I became relaxed, knowing that I now have a foundation here in Naujaat.

    At that point, Angutinguaq, who I called Haluuruluk. Since they were in the south in 1925, spokes some English, I was to call him, my Haluuruluk(my darn Hello). Now that my father and my brother-in-law here, I had a foundation and practically no more worries and stress. At that point, Father Dedier had said, the plane would be here to pick us up, after three or four days, to bring us to Igluligaarjuk. He said, we were free to do whatever we wanted to do. Now that we are free to do whatever we wanted to do, and there was lots of broken ice in Naujaat at this point. My Haluuruluk had a boat called Uvajuk, it was very tippy so it was called that name. Using Uvajuk, we would go down to the sea, in between the ice, to see if there might have been bearded seals or walruses. We were doing this, while we were waiting for a plane. Once we were out there, they got me to steer the boat, while my father, Haluuruluk and my brother-in-law were on the look out for the animals, maybe polar bears. We waited may be about four days, a single engine plane came to pick us up. And so, we board the plane, and we were now on our way to Igluligaarjuk. It was my first time in an airplane. I remember my father having a discussion with another Inuksuk, when I was much younger child. This man was on an airplane previously. My father had asked him, when the plane was taking off, do you watch the ground? We used to get very few planes in Naujaat in those days. So, this man was telling about an airplane ride he had. He said, when they were taking off, and he was looking down on the ground, he could see that as they were going so fast, he could see stripes of blue, green or red or yellow. Remembering that story, I was looking down on the water as we were taking off. As you know it was my first time on an airplane. I kept on a lookout for green, red or yellow stripes. There was nothing. It was actually a slow airplane. Perhaps, he was exaduating(sp), to make the story more interesting. And when we were going back home, we were taking off from the snow, it certainly was not like that, there were no beautiful stripes. There were about 10 or 12 of us, who were brought from Naujaat to Igluligaarjuk. We traveled to Chesterfield Inlet for about two-and-a-half hours.

    Zach: With a single engine airplane?

    Peter Irniq: Yes, with a single engine airplane. This airplane belonged to the RCMP, the one they used to bring us over. On the side of the airplane was a yellow stripe, with a dark blue paint. The tail of the plane had a yellow paint as well.

    Zach Kunuk: When you are getting close to Igluligaarjuk and the time you were landing to Chesterfield Inlet, can you tell us about that?

    Peter Irniq: I remember this very well! I don’t forget things at all, so I remember it very well. I am an Inuk. I grew up as a real Inuk, at that time. My mother and father, always used to tell me to be looking or observing…always. If you see something, then you will be able to tell me. Look for animals. I used to look around for anything, at that time. When we left Naujaat, it was a beautiful day. We arrived to Igluligaarjuk, it was even more beautiful. Hot! There were some clouds. There were beautiful clouds, with the sun shining. When we got closer, the sea water didn’t seem to be as beautiful. But the land, was beautiful, much like Naujaat environment. The stone formations were beautifully bright! I could see all those each time I look down below me, from an airplane. They very much resembled, Naujaat rock formations. Naujaat has those. When we were getting closer to landing, the land and sea were both beautifully pleasant. That time, we landed at Tasiraaluk(a small big pond). Tasiraaluk belonged to Iguligaarjuk, it was situation just around the houses. We landed there at Tasiraaluk, a fairly big pond. The airplanes landed so it was quite a large pond. The Roman Catholic Church used it for water supply. We beached on a beautiful rocky beach with the plane. When we beached, we all got off. I saw some Inuit there but then, I saw the Sisters, the Grey Nuns, for the first time in my life. They wore long dresses, and their hoods had little “furs”, but with lots of little holes, just like window screens. Some of the nuns were extremely beautiful! When I first started seeing Qablunaat, they were always beautiful. To see the Grey Nuns, they were even more beautiful than the Qablunaat, that I had seen previously, which weren’t many. I started to see the Qablunaat there, some belonged to the Department of Transport and others were priests. I used to think, I wonder if White People had ugly people. They all seemed to beautiful and handsome. The Grey Nuns that I noticed so much being different than most people, were to be our care takers, supervisors. They came to meet us. So, I was standing there, as I didn’t know where to go, nor have any place to go. My fellow Naujaarmiut were there, Paul Maniittuq, John Ninngak Mike Kusugaq, and Katherine and the late Francios Nanuraq. There was also Nick Amautinnuaq and Jose Kusugaq, who we knew only as Amaujaq in Naujaat. When our names were changed by the Government of the Northwest Territories, he became Jose Kusugaq. He was along with us. There was also Agatha from Naujaat. There were others, Maria, Theresie, now Theresie Tungilik. She has his father’s name today. Those are the ones who came here to Igluligaarjuk. There was this little Qablunaaq, he was slightly bigger than I am. As I was 11 years old, I was not that tall. I maybe, was about this height. As he was standing next to me, and kept looking at me and then asked me: “What is your name?” with a French accent. I understood what he said, as the year before in 1957, we were taught some English by the Roman Catholic priest, perhaps for a week or so. We were taught in English about things that were inside the Roman Catholic Mission in Naujaat. “Box” “Seal” “House” so we learned a little bit in English, then. “Fish” I used to tell my father about what we had learned. He used to recognize the words that I told him about. The four of them, including my Haluuruluk Angutinguaq, Tapatai and Savikataaq were in the land of the Qablunaat in 1925. They were in Newfoundland, Halifax and in Montreal. When they returned, they learned some English and were able to speak some English. So what I was learning, he would recognize them once I tell him about them. We were taught by Iksirajuakuluulaurtuq(Formerly Father Franzen), and Father Dedier. So, when he asked, “what is your name”, I understood him. As I answered him, I was extremely timid and said, Peter. Also, I was feeling very strange to see the Inuit of Igluligaarjuk. Everything was too awesome for me!

    From there, we were led by a Sister to the hostel. I walked along with my good friend Paul Maniittuq. Both of us walked in behind a Sister, as we were told to follow her. We were apparently going to the big house, the Turquetil Hall. It was a huge building, green in color. I turned to one side and noticed another big building. These buildings looked really big. I also noticed the Church Rectory, it was beautifully built. When I looked to the west, there was a Statue of Virgin Mary, surround by rocks, it was beautiful. From there, we saw another large building, two-storey, this was a hospital as well as being a home for the Nuns. This one was not to be our home, at that point. The one, we were going to was a two-storey hostel, it was to be our home for entire winter or during all the time, that we were going to be in Igluligaarjuk. We called it Iglurjuaraaluk – a real big hosue. When we got there, we were told to take our clothes off. We were to have a bath. We were deliced. We got our haircuts. We got our haircuts with those old fashioned manual hair cutters. I had a very short hair. In fact, all of us young boys had very short hair at that point. I also noticed that day that the young girls also got a hair cut, by cutting their hair, right across their forehead. They looked so different. It was the firs time I ever saw a bath tub, as we didn’t have bath tubs in Naujaat. It was the first time I ever saw and worn shoes. I put a short sleeve shirt for the first time. That was the first time, I ever put on a foreign clothing like that. Wow, it was so awesome! There were lots of boys and girls, Iglulingmiut, Qamanittuarmiut(Baker Lake) kids, Arviarmiut(Arviat kids), there were many of them. That day was something to remember, that very day in Igluligaarjuk.

    Then when the night time came, we were told to go into our large, huge bedroom. There were many beds. I was given my bed, complete with sleepers or pjamas. I didn’t know a darn thing about these items, as we did not use them in Naujaat. As an Inuk, I slept completely naked, at home. Just before, we went to bed, we were told “to kneel down” and pray. I guess, this was the beginning of praying. We prayed a lot. That evening was just the beginning of our praying. When we woke up the next morning, we prayed firs thing, then just before our breakfast, when we got to the school, we prayed first thing, we used to go to school at 9 in the morning. Right after we said the Lord’s Prayer, “our father who art in heaven…” then we sang, what is apparently a “Oh Canada” song, Canadian National Athem. I didn’t know what I was singing about but just trying to follow along and copied everybody. I was completely unaware of what these songs mean’t.

    We had our teacher, who was a Grey Nun. After that first morning of schooling, we had to pray again, just before we left for lunch. When we got into the dining room of our hostel, we prayed. Just before we left for school, we prayed again. When we got to the afternoon school, we prayed again and then sang, God Save the Queen. We stayed in school during the afternoon for about two-and-a-half hours. Then when the English classes were finished, a Roman Catholic priest came over to teach us catechasm. This activity was also very noticeable to myself, especially, during the early stages of staying there. I was happy with this exercise, as we were able to speak our own Inuktitut language. Whereas at the school, we were told to speak only English. We were completely forbidden to speak our own Inuktitut language.

    At that time, Father Farard used to teach us catechasm. I had some idea about the Bible and the prayer, mostly I’ve learned this from my mother. This was prior to going to Igluligaarjuk. Prayer books were used quite a lot in those days, I even have one at home, one of the first prayer books of the Church. The top page has a drawing of a church, couple of iglus and Inuit. I have the old prayer book. When that priest was teaching us about the bible, I was the most knowledgeable one about it. I knew so much that I won a prize from Father Fafard. This was shortly after, we’ve been there for a short time. For my Prayer Book knowledge, he gave me a green apple for a prize. I didn’t know it was an apple. When you go outside, you can eat it, he said. So, when we got outside, I decided to take a bite out of this apple: Oh, what a horrible taste!! I found the apple so horrible tasting, so I gave it to Marius Qajuuttaq, who was walking with me up to the Turquetil Hall. I told him, I just hated the taste of it so I said, you can have it. A year ago, he has already been to that school, so he like it and found it very delicious! As for me, I ate a lot of Inuit food, such as dried meat, so I totally found dried fish very delicious. So, I gave that apple to Marius. I wonder, if he sometimes thinks about it today.

    Zack: Would you like some break?

    Peter Irniq: Yes, let’s

    Filmmaker: Zacharias Kunuk

    Filmmaker Contact:


    Year of Production: 2008

    Country: Canada

    Region: Nunavut



    Nunavut Territory, Canada


  • Ask Zach & Ian questions via Twitter leading up to our screening in New York on March 31.

    Ask Zach & Ian questions via Twitter leading up to our screening in New York on March 31.

    by: Teague Schneiter

    channel: Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change

    IsumaTV announces our next interactive screening of our newest film Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change , taking place in New York City and online at We invite you to think of questions you would like to ask filmmakers Zacharias Kunuk and Ian Mauro at the event. You can send us these questions via Twitter using the hashtag #ikcc_nafvf . A hashtag is just a way of organizing tweets so that both Isuma and the Native American Film + Video Festival can work together. All you have to do is type your question in twitter and at the end of the tweet type: "#ikcc_nafvf". We look forward to hearing from you!

    If you're on facebook, you can rsvp for the event here




  • Artcirq


    by: Artcirq

    Inuit youth circus/filmmaking collective

    Artcirq is an Inuit artistic collective based in Igloolik, Nunavut.

    Founded in 1998 to combat youth suicide with artistic opportunity, Artcirq has evolved into a community-based circus and multimedia organization, allowing northern and southern artists to bridge and meet in a meaningful and creative way.




  • IsumaTV


    by: IsumaTV

    About IsumaTV

    Radio and Video interviews with the minds behind IsumaTV, and their reflections about its development.



  • Our Lands

    Our Lands

    by: admin

    online information resources about what is happneing to our earth, water, trees and air



  • Show me on the map: discussions on mining on Aboriginal lands

    Show me on the map: discussions on mining on Aboriginal lands

    by: Marie-Hélène Co...

    Show me on the map is a project produced by Arnait VIdeo Productions.

    Mining has already started to change the look of the towns of Nunavut in inordinate ways largely uncontrolled by the residents of the towns. Some people support and others are strongly opposed to mineral exploitation. Mining creates jobs but takes its toll on traditional visions of and relations to the land. Still, the debate is not really on and public, with few outlets for expressing everybody’s concern and point of view.

    We are using video as a tool for investigating our subjects, some of which are: the impact of industrialization and mining on local mythology and legends, how people make choices for their future, the coexistence of tradition and economical development, the power of communities in negociating with mining companies. This work will be shared through the internet, as a video installation and as a film. We hope you will participate in the debate.

    We would like to acknowledge the support of Canada Council for the Arts to make this project possible.




  • Testimony by Isuma

    Testimony by Isuma

    by: Zacharias Kunuk

    Residential School survivors testimonies

    Residential school survivors' testimonies, filmed by Zacharias Kunuk and Peter Irniq. Most testimonies are shared in Inuktitut.  Read English translations when available by clicking on Read More in the text below each film.




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